Tag: Amarna Tablets

In 1887 a Bedouin woman searching among ancient ruins near the Nile River discovered some inscribed clay tablets. This site, located 200 miles south of Cairo, was later named el-Amarna, and the tablets became known as the Amarna tablets or Amarna letters. Scholars have determined that these Amarna letters came from the royal archive of Pharaoh Akhenaten (1353–1337 B.C.), containing records of his father’s (Amenophis III) official correspondence with his various Canaanite vassal rulers.

The Last Days of Hattusa

08/29 | In the latter part of the second millennium B.C., the Hittite empire was a Near Eastern superpower. Its capital, Hattusa, was a great city of palaces and temples surrounded by   Read more…

Posted in The Ancient Near Eastern World.

When Egyptian Pharaohs Ruled Bronze Age Jerusalem

07/05 | What were Egyptian pharaohs doing in Bronze Age Jerusalem? Peter van der Veen investigates an Egyptian presence before the time of David.   Read more…

Posted in Jerusalem.

2016 BAS Scholarship Winners

12/13 | Straight from the field to you, hear from the individuals who were awarded BAS dig scholarships in 2016.   Read more…

Posted in Biblical Archaeology Topics.


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