BIBLE HISTORY DAILY

The Pharaohs’ Golden Parade

The mummies are being moved from Cairo to be housed in The Royal Mummies Gallery of the new National Museum of Egyptian Civilization.

On April 3rd, at noon, East Coast Time, 22 royal mummies are being transferred with great fanfare from Cairo’s Egyptian Museum to Fustat’s National Museum of Egyptian Civilization

It is The Pharaohs’ Golden Parade where the main celebrities are all long dead. Egypt is holding the procession to transfer the mummies of 18 pharaohs and 4 queens to their new permanent home at the National Museum of Egyptian Civilization in Fustat. New festive war chariots will adorn the route from the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, along with horses. The mummies themselves will travel by car, each vehicle labeled with the name of its occupant in Arabic, English, and of course, hieroglyph.

Abydos Ramses II Offering Gifts to Gods

Photo: Don Knebel
Abydos Ramses II Offering Gifts to Gods

The pharaohs being transferred include Ramses II, Ramses V, Ramses VI, Ramses IX, Seti I, Seqenenre, and Thutmose III. The Queens are Hatshepsut, Meritumun, wife of King Amenhotep I, and Ahmose Nefertari, wife of King Ahmose. They will be sent off with a 21-gun salute, and cheered on with military music, artistic performances, and contemporary Egyptian actors.

The event can be watched live from the Egyptian Ministry of Tourism Facebook page. They have updated their page to say that the streaming will begin at 6 PM, Cairo time (12 noon, U.S. East Coast Time).

 


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1 Responses

  1. Daniel says:

    Maybe it’s NOT a good idea to do this on the weekly Shabbat of the Week of Unleavened Bread (Lev.23) as ‘Pharaoh’ was the bad guy in this annual Biblical Festival and re-telling of The Exodus from Egypt.

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1 Responses

  1. Daniel says:

    Maybe it’s NOT a good idea to do this on the weekly Shabbat of the Week of Unleavened Bread (Lev.23) as ‘Pharaoh’ was the bad guy in this annual Biblical Festival and re-telling of The Exodus from Egypt.

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