BIBLE HISTORY DAILY

Google Helps Readers Understand Scroll Translations

Bible and Archaeology News

In September 2011, Google and the Israel Museum launched the ambitious Dead Sea Scrolls Digital Project, with the aim of eventually making English translations and high-resolution images of all of the Dead Sea Scroll manuscripts available online. Within days of the project’s launch, more than a million people from across the world had stopped to browse digital versions of five of the longest and most complete scrolls: the Great Isaiah Scroll, the Community Rule Scroll, the Habakkuk pesher (or commentary), the Temple Scroll and the War Scroll. In recent months, the project has expanded to allow visitors to view two separate, verse-by-verse English translations of the Isaiah Scroll, one based on the standard translation of the Masoretic text, and the other provided by scroll scholar and regular BAS lecturer Peter Flint. In viewing the two translations side by side, readers can consider the various ways an ancient text can be translated and the slight variations in meaning and interpretation that can result.

Google Helps Readers Understand Scroll Translations

In September 2011, Google and the Israel Museum launched the ambitious Dead Sea Scrolls Digital Project, with the aim of eventually making English translations and high-resolution images of all of the Dead Sea Scroll manuscripts available online.

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2 Responses

  1. Chris Knight says:

    http://dss.collections.imj.org.il/isaiah and go to 3.b.2 for the link.

  2. Elizabeth D. Murphy says:

    This is very interesting and worth pursuing, but why don’t you tell your readers how to find the site where we can compare the two versions? I am assuming that I can google on “Digital Dead Sea Scrolls,” but what contortions will I need to go through to find the textual comparisons? A link or URL would have been helpful. Thanks.

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2 Responses

  1. Chris Knight says:

    http://dss.collections.imj.org.il/isaiah and go to 3.b.2 for the link.

  2. Elizabeth D. Murphy says:

    This is very interesting and worth pursuing, but why don’t you tell your readers how to find the site where we can compare the two versions? I am assuming that I can google on “Digital Dead Sea Scrolls,” but what contortions will I need to go through to find the textual comparisons? A link or URL would have been helpful. Thanks.

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


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