BIBLE HISTORY DAILY

Babylonian Talmud Translated into Arabic

Bible and Archaeology News

After a controversial six-year-long translation project, a Jordanian think tank based in Amman published an Arabic translation of the Babylonian Talmud. After gaining enthusiastic responses to the project from the Arab League, 96 scholars began work on the translation. The editors are happy with the project, stating that the lack of an Arabic Talmud “has always been an obstacle to understanding Judaism.” Despite some polarized and politicized responses, most have adopted a positive impression of the massive scholarly work. Dr. Raquel Ukeles of the Israeli National Library states that the project stemmed from scientific curiosity, and the introduction discusses the Talmud in light of religious law along with the development of ancient politics and morality. Three years ago, Professor Mustafa Mansour of Cairo University translated the Mishnah into Arabic, reflecting an increasing interest in Jewish texts.

Talmud

After a controversial 6 year long translation project, a Jordanian think tank based in Amman published an Arabic translation of the Babylonian Talmud.

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4 Responses

  1. khalid says:

    how can i download it from net plz . tel me if any one know thats

  2. D. Buck says:

    Refresh my memory–these were translated from Aramaic, right?

  3. Noah Wiener says:

    Edward– The scholars worked under the aegis of Jordan’s Center for Middle Eastern Studies. According to the story in Haaretz, most of the 96 scholars were
    Aramaic-speaking Christians (see the read more link above). Hope that helps!

  4. Edward Becker says:

    Who are the 96 scholars doing the translation?

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4 Responses

  1. khalid says:

    how can i download it from net plz . tel me if any one know thats

  2. D. Buck says:

    Refresh my memory–these were translated from Aramaic, right?

  3. Noah Wiener says:

    Edward– The scholars worked under the aegis of Jordan’s Center for Middle Eastern Studies. According to the story in Haaretz, most of the 96 scholars were
    Aramaic-speaking Christians (see the read more link above). Hope that helps!

  4. Edward Becker says:

    Who are the 96 scholars doing the translation?

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