Did Jesus Exist? An Essential Guide to the Evidence Jesus Existed

James H. Charlesworth summarizes the historical evidence of Jesus

Read the full review by John Merrill.

New Testament and Dead Sea Scroll scholar James H. Charlesworth summarizes the historical evidence of Jesus and answers that all-important question: Did Jesus exist?

The Historical Jesus: An Essential Guide

by James H. Charlesworth

(Nashville: Abingdon Press, 2008), 131 pp., $18 (softcover)

 
Did Jesus exist? After reading James H. Charlesworth’s The Historical Jesus: An Essential Guide, reviewer and Biblical Archaeology Review contributing editor John Merrill believes there is considerable evidence Jesus existed. According to Merrill, Charlesworth’s book boils down the historical evidence of Jesus to 27 key questions—a sort of “Everything you wanted to know about the historical Jesus (but were afraid to ask).” Included are simple, straight-forward discussions of scholarly research into the evidence Jesus existed, the relationship between Jesus and the Judaism of his day, and the archaeological and non-biblical, textual evidence Jesus existed.

Merrill finds Charlesworth’s discussion of Jesus’ beliefs in the context of Second Temple Judaism particularly valuable for answering the question, “Did Jesus exist?” As argued by Charlesworth, concepts like grace, forgiveness and belief in resurrection were well developed within Jewish thought by the time of Jesus’ ministry. The historical evidence of Jesus illustrates that earliest Christianity was very much a “Jewish phenomenon.” But as the historical evidence of Jesus also shows, Jesus’ message cannot be easily identified with the teachings of other Jewish groups.

But in answering the question, “Did Jesus exist?” Charlesworth’s Essential Guide also leaves out a few important details, writes Merrill. For example, in his discussion of the evidence Jesus existed, Charlesworth only briefly examines the relationship between Jesus and the Essenes, the sectarian Jews often associated with the Dead Sea Scrolls and the library of Qumran. And while Merrill believes Charlesworth’s 27-question approach runs the risk of over simplifying the historical evidence of Jesus, he concludes the approach is useful for summarizing the evidence Jesus existed.

 

Read the full review by John Merrill.

 


 

The Historical Jesus: An Essential Guide

The Historical Jesus: An Essential Guide

by James H. Charlesworth

(Nashville: Abingdon Press, 2008), 131 pp., $18 (softcover)


Read the full review by John Merrill.

Posted in Daily, Jesus/Historical Jesus.

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5 Responses

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  • Gregory says

    Nobody has mentioned the best proof (for non-Christians) that Jesus existed. He is specifically mentioned in TWO prominent non-Christian sources : the Roman historian Tacitus and the Jewish historian Flavius Josephus, neither particularly sympathetic to Christianity. There are 4 facts to be drawn from these 2 sources: 1) Jesus existed,2) he had a following, 3) he was executed by the Roman authorities in Judea and 4) his following continued past his death.

  • Sarah says

    And He did speak about military and was great! For your information, Mr. Rabbi, you didn’t connect the dots (like when Jesus says Matthew 9:13, people don’t obey, and as a result they Murdered Him, basically (Matthew 12:7) or that all The prophecies came true. . .and please see and connect. The claim that with Messiah’s reign will bring in everlasting peace to David’s throne is spiritual because David’s throne’s curse says sword every generation because David (had murderous thought+ followed) murdered the man for his wife. And when you have connected, welcome! Thanks for reading 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

  • Sarah says

    Stop. He wasn’t married, that’s aberration, how about I say you two guys were married? He didn’t give himself in marriage, neither did any. It is written, it is written, He did not commit, He did not give himself (other translations, too) unto men John 2:24.

  • Jay says

    This is mostly a comment on the above comments by others.I’ll start with the claim Jesus was born in Bethlehem.Micah 5:2 was never,ever a prophesy about where the Messiah was to be born.Verse 2 is pulled out of context with surrounding verses and made to seem a prophecy by the writer of Matthew.
    If you read Micah 5:1-6 in context this is about a military leader,which Jesus never was.Verse 1 mentions troops,v.6 shows the land of Assyria wasted by war.The 2 words Bethlehem Ephratah when connected together never means the town of Bethlehem it means the man named Bethlehem and the cult of Bethlehem Ephratah mentioned in Deuteronomy and Ruth,it is not a prophecy of where the Messiah was to be born.If you notice in Matt.2:6 the writer of Matthew(whoever he was)deliberately leaves out the word Ephratah and substitutes the word Juda,making it seem to be about the town of Bethlehem.The writer of Matthew screws up a lot of things in the book of Matthew.I was going to type more but i am not sure how long comments can be.Anyone responding to this email forward it to me at my email address above.Thanks.
    Jay Osborne

  • Aristofanes says

    I´d like to hear something from Dr. John Meier about this topic (Jesus was not born in Bethlehem).

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