BIBLE HISTORY DAILY

Left-Handed People in the Bible

Is there a genetic link to Benjamite lefties?

left-handed-people-bible

There are only three mentions of left-handed people in the Bible—and all of them refer to members of the tribe of Benjamin, including their deadly accurate slingers (see drawing above). Were these people from the tribe of Benjamin left-handed by nature or nurture? Modern studies in the genetics of left-handedness may be able to shed light on this curious case. (Drawing by Josh Seevers, courtesy of Boyd Seevers)

The Hebrew Bible mentions left-handed people on three occasions: the story of Ehud’s assassination of the Moabite king (Judges 3:12–30), the 700 Benjamites who could use the sling with deadly accuracy (Judges 20:16) and the two-dozen ambidextrous warriors who came to support David in Hebron (1 Chronicles 12:2). All of these stories of left-handed people in the Bible appear in military contexts, and, curiously, all involve members of the tribe of Benjamin.

In a Biblical Views column in the May/June 2013 issue of Biblical Archaeology Review, professors Boyd Seevers and Joanna Klein ask the question, “Were these warriors from the tribe of Benjamin left-handed by nature or nurture?” Citing studies in the genetics of left-handedness and Biblical texts, Seevers and Klein show that it may have been a bit of both.

Benjamites may have been genetically disposed to left-handedness at birth, but the trait may also have been encouraged in soldiers to give them a strategic advantage in combat—somewhat like left-handed baseball pitchers today—against right-handed opponents who were unaccustomed to fighting “lefties.” Warriors from the tribe of Benjamin might have been trained to be equally or more effective with their left hands.

Then again, perhaps the Biblical writers simply enjoyed a bit of word play. The name Benjamin means “son of (my) right hand.” Perhaps the irony of left-handed “sons of right-handers” caused the Biblical authors to take note in these cases.
For more about the tribe of Benjamin, left-handedness in the Bible, and the genetics of left-handedness, see Boyd Seevers and Joanna Klein, Biblical Views: Left-Handed Sons of Right-Handers in the May/June 2013 issue of Biblical Archaeology Review.

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The free eBook Life in the Ancient World guides you through craft centers in ancient Jerusalem, family structure across Israel and articles on ancient practices—from dining to makeup—across the Mediterranean world.

Related reading in Bible History Daily:

The First Historical Evidence of King David from the Bible

Who Were the Ammonites, Moabites and Edomites in the Bible?

Who Are the Nephilim?

Beth Shean in the Bible and Archaeology
The story of the death of King Saul as told by archaeology and the Bible


This Bible History Daily feature was originally published on May 31, 2013.


 


32 Responses

  1. Valera says:

    One of the most common questions posed to me as a child psychologist and speech therapist is a question about reading disorders. And more often than not, they come from parents of children who are left handed.
    https://ekidz.eu/en/left-handed-learning-difficulty/

  2. A.H. says:

    The reason that left-handed is usually specifically mentioned in military context, is because of the military formation. Inserting several left-hand men into the regiment will throw off the unity of the formation and cause compilcations when marching or fighting or doing other maneuvers. So military commanders could either force the left-handed people to fight right-handed (which would reduce agility and accuracy) or not allow left-handed people to be in such formations, or form a special unit of left-handers in order to maintain a unity of formation (which is what is going on here). And that is primarily why it is mentioned in military context and not in other places.

  3. Edward Morse says:

    There wasn’t much about genetics in the article. I was hoping it might shed light on why my niece is the only left-hander in the family.
    Benjamin is also interpreted as “BenYomin”, “son of my days (old age).

  4. David Paul says:

    Lisa, you are about 80% wrong. Binyaamiyn absolutely does mean “son of right hand”. To say it does not mean that is nonsense. However, because the concept of what we call “compass directions” in the Bible is based on the perspective of looking east toward the rising son, that is, in the direction the mercy seat was oriented in the temple, which represents the direction YHWH theoretically faces on His throne, “north” and “left” correspond and “south” and “right” correspond. There are numerous places in the Bible where yaamiyn clearly denotes YHWH’s or a human’s “right hand” and not “south-ness”. (Exo. 15:6, 12; Job 40:14; Psa. 89:13 are just a few examples). It is possible that Binyaamiyn could men “southerner” (more accurately, “son of south”), but to settle on that possibility, the context must clearly suggest that a compass direction is intended.

    Regarding ‘Eihuudh, he is described not explicitly as left-handed, but as “bound” in his right hand. Even if one insisted on construing his description to mean “a man bound in his south hand”, it would and could only mean he was bound in his right hand. That probably is intended to convey he was left-handed, but the precise nature of this condition can’t be certain. It may refer to a congenital condition, or perhaps a deliberate decision to enforce left-handedness.

    In my opinion, this characteristic is a prophetic marker for an “against nature” condition that exists in the tribe of Binyaamiyn. I will support that conclusion in a book that I am developing. Stay tuned.

  5. Gary W. Harper says:

    Left-handedness, runs in families. My dad, I, some of my ancestors, were left-handed. My great-grandfather would write two copies of the same letter, simultaneously. Benjamites, have the same genetic traits. It is not all of them, who are left-handed; but it is, many of them.

    Fighting with the left hand, is also a direct insult to your enemies. I can beat you with my good hand held behind my back, even on my worst day. That, was the implication. It was meant to be an insult, and most impressive, and domineering. A way to strike abject fear, into the hearts of your enemies. So that they would come to negotiate, rather than to fight, and thus, all be slaughtered. The very real threat of an assured destruction, is a pretty good negotiating point.

    Benjamin, were Moses’ shock troops. They had first dibs, on the territory they all first entered, once they were West of the Jordan. And there was nothing wrong with resting beneath the palm trees, of the Plain of Jericho.

  6. Lisa Liel says:

    Benjamin doesn’t mean “son of my right hand”. It means “Southerner”. Benjamin was born far to the south of all of his brothers. In ancient semitic languages, the word “yemin” and variants thereof meant “south”. Yemen still carries that in its name.

  7. John Ronning says:

    Your so-called left-handers in 1 Chron 12:2 were said to be ambidextrous, not left-handed. Some suggest that the way Ehud was described might indicate he was crippled in his right hand, so not necessarily left-handed by nature (however the story does show as suggested that being left-handed, since that was unexpected, could be used to strategic advantage).

  8. Martha-Virginia Spivey says:

    Very interesting. I am left handed. In looking at the way Hebrew and Arabic are written – right to left – instead of left to right, I have always thought that the scribes must have been left handed. Right to left would be my natural way of writing if I hadn’t been taught by right handed teachers and systems who taught left to right. The same is true of the way letters are taught be be shaped. As an experiment try looking at the printing charts in school classrooms. Put your pencil in your right hand and write an O looking at the chart. Now put your pencil in your left hand and without looking at the church write an O that feels comfortable. See the difference.

  9. Sang hyun yoon says:

    What shape of thumb nail for both hands? Can you see the opposite moon on them?

  10. DanKnezacek says:

    Here’s a thought; since Hebrew writes from right to left it presents problems for right handed persons. If you are writing with a quill pen a right handed person would tend to smear the still-wet ink as his hand slid over it. It seems then that the person or persons who developed Hebrew script were most likely left-handed who would not have this problem.

    Since Moses was known as one of the early developers of Hebrew script, is it possible that Moses himself was left-handed?

  11. Chris says:

    I think Joab was a relative of David, if you are familiar with the scripture. They didn’t want to destroy the entire tribe however, after the loss they went back and did just that destroyed them. It starts out something like the scripture regarding Sodom and Gomorrah. ie… left handed/

  12. JAmes says:

    Maybe by mentioning that Ehud was left-handed indicates that God can use someone who was different; someone unconventional; someone like Gideon who was a part of a remnant to do God’s will. Ehud, being from the tribe of Benjamin was someone who was left-handed living in a right-handed world. God is unconventional and He doesn’t do everything the same way every time. He used a little boy to kill a giant; two fish and five loaves to feed thousands; and a left-handed man living in a right-handed world to kill an evil king and free God people to live in peace.

  13. Mary says:

    i am a lefty. went to catholic school-with nuns-in second grade when learning how to print my name she would always hit me with a ruler trying to make me use my right hand…that did not work…or tie my left hand behind my back…that did not work…my mother had a talk with the bishop and she stoped. my grand mother my mom’s mom was also left handed and two boy coz. non of my children are left handed or non of my grand children. I always wished that one of them would be…but I can do a lot of things with both hands and they can’t…

  14. Benjamin says:

    I am Benjamin. I am left handed. Never the less I do not do any Sports or Combat as a left handed person. I have always handled a gun or played golf etc… as right handed people do. This was a interesting post though!

  15. d says:

    i think the reason left handed people are brought to attention is there are so few which puts them at an advantage in battle,first the can use the right hand to grab the right hand in defense while immobilizing the left with the sword.if my thinking is clear.

  16. Nancy Hobday says:

    I Googled this article because I read another on-line article that said that left handedness is mentioned 25 times and all references were negative. I read the Bible from cover to cover several times and I did not remember such references. I am glad I visited this site and discussion. I am happy that the commenters pointed out the scriptures where actual left handed warriors or righteous assassins were mentioned. The discussion about Peter was fascinating. I am going to the other discussion board and raise these points. I am married to a lefty and one parent and 2 brothers are lefties. I love them all! I find them to be analytical, either in math/science, or my mother was very wise, but not athletic. My husband and one lefty brother were WICKED baseball players. They were not pro, but good hitters and pitchers that played for recreation. They are too old to play now, LOL.

  17. J.A.Partridge says:

    As a lefty and a former fencer I can vouch that righties who haven’t practiced against lefties are at a definite disadvantage. Most combat is “muscle memory” and their normal reactions are wrong. They tend to hesitate as they attempt to mentally adjust.

  18. Danny Martin Rosabal Castellòn says:

    Traits* sorry auto correct but question is how did I roots come from Africa to Spain to Cuba?we all have a common ancestor is it David??

  19. Danny Martin Rosabal Castellòn says:

    Ok so I’m lefty and how did my ancestor trusts end up in CUBA??? I’m from CUBA raised in Miami and some of my families are lefty on my dad side and we are African decendient and spanish I always felt I was related to Abramham David and Daniel between of them 3.. I wondered for long time who is the Origen of left handlers??

  20. The Leftovers, Episode 7: The writers really like John 3:16 - Vox says:

    […] a coincidence. Left-handedness is an interesting concept in Scripture. The Old Testament contains several stories of lefties, and all of them are set within a context of war.  They also all, strangely enough, […]

  21. Connie says:

    In all cases where left-handedness is mentioned, it appears that it was intentional that we are made aware that the person was indeed left-handed. For example, in the study of Judges 3, Ehud, it is mentioned more than once (15,21) and is really a take-away from the story. There has to be a reason this was stressed. Ehud could have been introduced simply as a Benjamite, son of Gera and the story told without ever mentioning that he was left-handed. When I studied Judges, the reasoning for this reference, and then again in chapter 20, intrigued me so I asked the Holy Spirit for answers. In God’s word, I believe nothing is wasted or it wouldn’t be there. So why this mention of left-handedness? None of what’s written here seems to satisfy. Athough I have seen reference to left-handedness being considered weakness in the Bible, I agree with a previous writer that really, the mentions of left-handedness for the most part seems to be an advantage or strength in battle at the very least. (Although I do see that the right hand is used in blessing and the place of favor in places in scripture as well over the left hand (Genesis 48:17-20) and (Matt 25 the sheep and goats) but this has nothing to do with being “left-handed” per se. So with this being said, I think the focus has to be on the trait of being left-handed. Often we try to make sense of scripture by taking a certain part and making something of it, instead of looking at the whole, as it was intended. In the whole counsel of the word of God, then, what can we glean from this trait of left-handedness and why the Holy Spirit would go to such an extent to make sure that we made note of it, especially in reference to fighting and battle? If left-handedness was indeed seen as weakness because more people were right-handed (statistics seem to be somewhere in the 80/20 range), it would seem God was trying to make a statement. However, this is not good enough for me because I do not see in the Holy Scriptures where God has made a point to tell us that left-handedness is a weakness. (If anyone can show me where, please do because I want truth over being right!) So what I have gathered is this. God knew what we would believe today even back then.. If it was not considered weakness back then, it has been challenged today as we see in the notes above and in other google references, especially in light of those who are trying to argue the gay/left-handed connection. Perhaps the whole point, in light of seeing scripture in its entirety, is that God can use whoever He wants to, to accomplish His work and sometimes it is the people that society (even Gods own people) have written off as useless or weak or unvalued: 1 Cor 1:26 “Look carefully at your call, brothers and sisters. By human standards, not many of you are deemed to be wise. Not many are considered powerful. Not many of you come from royalty, right? 27 But celebrate this: God selected the world’s foolish to bring shame upon those who think they are wise; likewise, He selected the world’s weak to bring disgrace upon those who think they are strong. 28 God selected the common and the castoff, whatever lacks status, so He could invalidate the claims of those who think those things are significant. 29 So it makes no sense for any person to boast in God’s presence. 30 Instead, credit God with your new situation: you are united with Jesus the Anointed. He is God’s wisdom for us and more. He is our righteousness and holiness and redemption. 31 As the Scripture says: “If someone wants to boast, he should boast in the Lord.”

  22. Angela Bernales says:

    Angela from Nueva Vida Bookstore says
    Left Handed and right handed swordsmen are symbols of strength or power. The power of the flesh is represented in both ways of handling a sword either right or left. The world power acts in both ways but the resulting consequences always are catastrophic because it relies solely in the fleshy nature of humankind. An

  23. Melese M says:

    The Benjamites are not left handed people, and genetics has nothing to do with their roles. From their name, they represent characteristics of people who play a role in judgement. These include Judges, victims and the law.

    My regard

  24. galen young says:

    Keep in mind that Peter, was a Zealot. In occupied Roman territory. Only Roman Soldiers, temple guards, and a few authorized body guards, were allowed to openly carry a sword.

    Peter’s sword would have been carried hidden beneath his robes, like all Zealots.

    Peter was constantly urging Jesus to lead the revolt to over-throw Rome. He and Judas wanted Jesus to begin openly displaying defiance to Rome.

  25. Carl fenn says:

    I don’t know why people fared left handed swordsmen, but I suppose thinking about it they are
    trained to fight a right handed sowrdsmen, one must presume they leave an open gard in certain
    moves, best to be ampidextrous I think as one arm gets tired yos and use the other, or better
    sword in one dagger in other, they used to fight that was as well. The scotts left handers were
    more effective with a sword against right handed people it is claimed.

  26. Neat Proctor says:

    Both of our parents were Lefties; however the 6 children were all right handed!!
    TGD

  27. Eric Frandsen says:

    As far as Peter and Malchus are concerned. I figure if Peter is right handed he would have worn his sword on his left side, and he stood opposing Malchus face to face he drew his sword out of his left side sheath. Then in one swing to his right toward Malchus neck, (I figure he meant to take his head off) the Malchus ducked away to his right leaving his left ear vulnerable and in line of the sword wielded by Peter. It is either that or if Peter only meant to cut his left ear off then he would have been the most renowned and skilled swordsman on earth coming from being just a fisherman.

  28. D. Jay says:

    It seems Simon Peter may have been left-handed as well. In the garden, when he cut off Malchus’ ear, they would probably have been facing each other. Peter swung his sword, Malchus tried to duck and lost his right ear in the glancing blow–the swing of a left-handed person.

  29. Kirkland Mason says:

    It is true that we live in a right-handed world, but left-handedness may provide advantages in numerous ways, whether in sport or warfare. The Biblical references provide some insight into the advantage taken by southpaws in these applications but there is so much more which remains untold, yet well comprehended by those taken at the disadvantage by them. The extended right hand, whether clasping another’s right hand in handshake or taking hold of the beard to exchange the customary greeting kiss, as in Joab’s case, signaled that there was no intent of malice. Joab may well have been left-handed or perhaps ambidextrous. Striking an intended death blow with the off-hand, even with the element of surprise, would be perilous at best and disastrous at its worst. Not so with Ehud, of course, who took full advantage of his left-handedness and subsequently escaped undetected.
    In baseball the right-handed batter is disadvantaged by the left-handed pitcher and vice-versa, as attested by the frequent substitutions from the bullpen in the latter innings of a close game. Most positions on the field provide advantage to the right-hander with the exception of first base, clearly the domain of the lefty who can take full advantage of the extended right catching hand.
    Boxers and martial artists can all attest to the strategic advantages afforded the southpaw combatants, and the same principal may be applied in many other sports as well. Golf is one which reveals some interesting perspectives on handedness, particularly when it comes to the hook and slice applied to the drive. Being ambidextrous can come in handy in certain situations, however how many golfers carry both right and left-handed clubs? It has been said that golf is ideally suited to the left-hander using right-handed clubs, which I found to be the case when I switched!

  30. Robert Radcliffe says:

    According to 2 Sam 20:8-10 (not explicitly, but by implication), Joab, David’s general, was also left-handed. Joab’s tribal affiliation is obscure; he may have been a member of Bnay Ammon, i.e. a non-Israelite, like many of David’s “mighty men”.
    N.B. this incident has literary parallels to the Ehud incident cited.

  31. Fay says:

    My husband is right-handed and his name is Ben…just because a person is left-handed does not mean they are less righteous!!! Old school marks differences based on physical appearance. Get some ethics on yourselves. White, black, yellow, young, old, big or small no matter what, if you’re righteous, you’re righteous!!!

  32. D. C. Smith says:

    I don’t think the analogy to baseball works, except perhaps for switch hitters. It fits perfectly well, however, for gunslingers of the old west who survived cavalry skirmishes during the civil war.

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32 Responses

  1. Valera says:

    One of the most common questions posed to me as a child psychologist and speech therapist is a question about reading disorders. And more often than not, they come from parents of children who are left handed.
    https://ekidz.eu/en/left-handed-learning-difficulty/

  2. A.H. says:

    The reason that left-handed is usually specifically mentioned in military context, is because of the military formation. Inserting several left-hand men into the regiment will throw off the unity of the formation and cause compilcations when marching or fighting or doing other maneuvers. So military commanders could either force the left-handed people to fight right-handed (which would reduce agility and accuracy) or not allow left-handed people to be in such formations, or form a special unit of left-handers in order to maintain a unity of formation (which is what is going on here). And that is primarily why it is mentioned in military context and not in other places.

  3. Edward Morse says:

    There wasn’t much about genetics in the article. I was hoping it might shed light on why my niece is the only left-hander in the family.
    Benjamin is also interpreted as “BenYomin”, “son of my days (old age).

  4. David Paul says:

    Lisa, you are about 80% wrong. Binyaamiyn absolutely does mean “son of right hand”. To say it does not mean that is nonsense. However, because the concept of what we call “compass directions” in the Bible is based on the perspective of looking east toward the rising son, that is, in the direction the mercy seat was oriented in the temple, which represents the direction YHWH theoretically faces on His throne, “north” and “left” correspond and “south” and “right” correspond. There are numerous places in the Bible where yaamiyn clearly denotes YHWH’s or a human’s “right hand” and not “south-ness”. (Exo. 15:6, 12; Job 40:14; Psa. 89:13 are just a few examples). It is possible that Binyaamiyn could men “southerner” (more accurately, “son of south”), but to settle on that possibility, the context must clearly suggest that a compass direction is intended.

    Regarding ‘Eihuudh, he is described not explicitly as left-handed, but as “bound” in his right hand. Even if one insisted on construing his description to mean “a man bound in his south hand”, it would and could only mean he was bound in his right hand. That probably is intended to convey he was left-handed, but the precise nature of this condition can’t be certain. It may refer to a congenital condition, or perhaps a deliberate decision to enforce left-handedness.

    In my opinion, this characteristic is a prophetic marker for an “against nature” condition that exists in the tribe of Binyaamiyn. I will support that conclusion in a book that I am developing. Stay tuned.

  5. Gary W. Harper says:

    Left-handedness, runs in families. My dad, I, some of my ancestors, were left-handed. My great-grandfather would write two copies of the same letter, simultaneously. Benjamites, have the same genetic traits. It is not all of them, who are left-handed; but it is, many of them.

    Fighting with the left hand, is also a direct insult to your enemies. I can beat you with my good hand held behind my back, even on my worst day. That, was the implication. It was meant to be an insult, and most impressive, and domineering. A way to strike abject fear, into the hearts of your enemies. So that they would come to negotiate, rather than to fight, and thus, all be slaughtered. The very real threat of an assured destruction, is a pretty good negotiating point.

    Benjamin, were Moses’ shock troops. They had first dibs, on the territory they all first entered, once they were West of the Jordan. And there was nothing wrong with resting beneath the palm trees, of the Plain of Jericho.

  6. Lisa Liel says:

    Benjamin doesn’t mean “son of my right hand”. It means “Southerner”. Benjamin was born far to the south of all of his brothers. In ancient semitic languages, the word “yemin” and variants thereof meant “south”. Yemen still carries that in its name.

  7. John Ronning says:

    Your so-called left-handers in 1 Chron 12:2 were said to be ambidextrous, not left-handed. Some suggest that the way Ehud was described might indicate he was crippled in his right hand, so not necessarily left-handed by nature (however the story does show as suggested that being left-handed, since that was unexpected, could be used to strategic advantage).

  8. Martha-Virginia Spivey says:

    Very interesting. I am left handed. In looking at the way Hebrew and Arabic are written – right to left – instead of left to right, I have always thought that the scribes must have been left handed. Right to left would be my natural way of writing if I hadn’t been taught by right handed teachers and systems who taught left to right. The same is true of the way letters are taught be be shaped. As an experiment try looking at the printing charts in school classrooms. Put your pencil in your right hand and write an O looking at the chart. Now put your pencil in your left hand and without looking at the church write an O that feels comfortable. See the difference.

  9. Sang hyun yoon says:

    What shape of thumb nail for both hands? Can you see the opposite moon on them?

  10. DanKnezacek says:

    Here’s a thought; since Hebrew writes from right to left it presents problems for right handed persons. If you are writing with a quill pen a right handed person would tend to smear the still-wet ink as his hand slid over it. It seems then that the person or persons who developed Hebrew script were most likely left-handed who would not have this problem.

    Since Moses was known as one of the early developers of Hebrew script, is it possible that Moses himself was left-handed?

  11. Chris says:

    I think Joab was a relative of David, if you are familiar with the scripture. They didn’t want to destroy the entire tribe however, after the loss they went back and did just that destroyed them. It starts out something like the scripture regarding Sodom and Gomorrah. ie… left handed/

  12. JAmes says:

    Maybe by mentioning that Ehud was left-handed indicates that God can use someone who was different; someone unconventional; someone like Gideon who was a part of a remnant to do God’s will. Ehud, being from the tribe of Benjamin was someone who was left-handed living in a right-handed world. God is unconventional and He doesn’t do everything the same way every time. He used a little boy to kill a giant; two fish and five loaves to feed thousands; and a left-handed man living in a right-handed world to kill an evil king and free God people to live in peace.

  13. Mary says:

    i am a lefty. went to catholic school-with nuns-in second grade when learning how to print my name she would always hit me with a ruler trying to make me use my right hand…that did not work…or tie my left hand behind my back…that did not work…my mother had a talk with the bishop and she stoped. my grand mother my mom’s mom was also left handed and two boy coz. non of my children are left handed or non of my grand children. I always wished that one of them would be…but I can do a lot of things with both hands and they can’t…

  14. Benjamin says:

    I am Benjamin. I am left handed. Never the less I do not do any Sports or Combat as a left handed person. I have always handled a gun or played golf etc… as right handed people do. This was a interesting post though!

  15. d says:

    i think the reason left handed people are brought to attention is there are so few which puts them at an advantage in battle,first the can use the right hand to grab the right hand in defense while immobilizing the left with the sword.if my thinking is clear.

  16. Nancy Hobday says:

    I Googled this article because I read another on-line article that said that left handedness is mentioned 25 times and all references were negative. I read the Bible from cover to cover several times and I did not remember such references. I am glad I visited this site and discussion. I am happy that the commenters pointed out the scriptures where actual left handed warriors or righteous assassins were mentioned. The discussion about Peter was fascinating. I am going to the other discussion board and raise these points. I am married to a lefty and one parent and 2 brothers are lefties. I love them all! I find them to be analytical, either in math/science, or my mother was very wise, but not athletic. My husband and one lefty brother were WICKED baseball players. They were not pro, but good hitters and pitchers that played for recreation. They are too old to play now, LOL.

  17. J.A.Partridge says:

    As a lefty and a former fencer I can vouch that righties who haven’t practiced against lefties are at a definite disadvantage. Most combat is “muscle memory” and their normal reactions are wrong. They tend to hesitate as they attempt to mentally adjust.

  18. Danny Martin Rosabal Castellòn says:

    Traits* sorry auto correct but question is how did I roots come from Africa to Spain to Cuba?we all have a common ancestor is it David??

  19. Danny Martin Rosabal Castellòn says:

    Ok so I’m lefty and how did my ancestor trusts end up in CUBA??? I’m from CUBA raised in Miami and some of my families are lefty on my dad side and we are African decendient and spanish I always felt I was related to Abramham David and Daniel between of them 3.. I wondered for long time who is the Origen of left handlers??

  20. The Leftovers, Episode 7: The writers really like John 3:16 - Vox says:

    […] a coincidence. Left-handedness is an interesting concept in Scripture. The Old Testament contains several stories of lefties, and all of them are set within a context of war.  They also all, strangely enough, […]

  21. Connie says:

    In all cases where left-handedness is mentioned, it appears that it was intentional that we are made aware that the person was indeed left-handed. For example, in the study of Judges 3, Ehud, it is mentioned more than once (15,21) and is really a take-away from the story. There has to be a reason this was stressed. Ehud could have been introduced simply as a Benjamite, son of Gera and the story told without ever mentioning that he was left-handed. When I studied Judges, the reasoning for this reference, and then again in chapter 20, intrigued me so I asked the Holy Spirit for answers. In God’s word, I believe nothing is wasted or it wouldn’t be there. So why this mention of left-handedness? None of what’s written here seems to satisfy. Athough I have seen reference to left-handedness being considered weakness in the Bible, I agree with a previous writer that really, the mentions of left-handedness for the most part seems to be an advantage or strength in battle at the very least. (Although I do see that the right hand is used in blessing and the place of favor in places in scripture as well over the left hand (Genesis 48:17-20) and (Matt 25 the sheep and goats) but this has nothing to do with being “left-handed” per se. So with this being said, I think the focus has to be on the trait of being left-handed. Often we try to make sense of scripture by taking a certain part and making something of it, instead of looking at the whole, as it was intended. In the whole counsel of the word of God, then, what can we glean from this trait of left-handedness and why the Holy Spirit would go to such an extent to make sure that we made note of it, especially in reference to fighting and battle? If left-handedness was indeed seen as weakness because more people were right-handed (statistics seem to be somewhere in the 80/20 range), it would seem God was trying to make a statement. However, this is not good enough for me because I do not see in the Holy Scriptures where God has made a point to tell us that left-handedness is a weakness. (If anyone can show me where, please do because I want truth over being right!) So what I have gathered is this. God knew what we would believe today even back then.. If it was not considered weakness back then, it has been challenged today as we see in the notes above and in other google references, especially in light of those who are trying to argue the gay/left-handed connection. Perhaps the whole point, in light of seeing scripture in its entirety, is that God can use whoever He wants to, to accomplish His work and sometimes it is the people that society (even Gods own people) have written off as useless or weak or unvalued: 1 Cor 1:26 “Look carefully at your call, brothers and sisters. By human standards, not many of you are deemed to be wise. Not many are considered powerful. Not many of you come from royalty, right? 27 But celebrate this: God selected the world’s foolish to bring shame upon those who think they are wise; likewise, He selected the world’s weak to bring disgrace upon those who think they are strong. 28 God selected the common and the castoff, whatever lacks status, so He could invalidate the claims of those who think those things are significant. 29 So it makes no sense for any person to boast in God’s presence. 30 Instead, credit God with your new situation: you are united with Jesus the Anointed. He is God’s wisdom for us and more. He is our righteousness and holiness and redemption. 31 As the Scripture says: “If someone wants to boast, he should boast in the Lord.”

  22. Angela Bernales says:

    Angela from Nueva Vida Bookstore says
    Left Handed and right handed swordsmen are symbols of strength or power. The power of the flesh is represented in both ways of handling a sword either right or left. The world power acts in both ways but the resulting consequences always are catastrophic because it relies solely in the fleshy nature of humankind. An

  23. Melese M says:

    The Benjamites are not left handed people, and genetics has nothing to do with their roles. From their name, they represent characteristics of people who play a role in judgement. These include Judges, victims and the law.

    My regard

  24. galen young says:

    Keep in mind that Peter, was a Zealot. In occupied Roman territory. Only Roman Soldiers, temple guards, and a few authorized body guards, were allowed to openly carry a sword.

    Peter’s sword would have been carried hidden beneath his robes, like all Zealots.

    Peter was constantly urging Jesus to lead the revolt to over-throw Rome. He and Judas wanted Jesus to begin openly displaying defiance to Rome.

  25. Carl fenn says:

    I don’t know why people fared left handed swordsmen, but I suppose thinking about it they are
    trained to fight a right handed sowrdsmen, one must presume they leave an open gard in certain
    moves, best to be ampidextrous I think as one arm gets tired yos and use the other, or better
    sword in one dagger in other, they used to fight that was as well. The scotts left handers were
    more effective with a sword against right handed people it is claimed.

  26. Neat Proctor says:

    Both of our parents were Lefties; however the 6 children were all right handed!!
    TGD

  27. Eric Frandsen says:

    As far as Peter and Malchus are concerned. I figure if Peter is right handed he would have worn his sword on his left side, and he stood opposing Malchus face to face he drew his sword out of his left side sheath. Then in one swing to his right toward Malchus neck, (I figure he meant to take his head off) the Malchus ducked away to his right leaving his left ear vulnerable and in line of the sword wielded by Peter. It is either that or if Peter only meant to cut his left ear off then he would have been the most renowned and skilled swordsman on earth coming from being just a fisherman.

  28. D. Jay says:

    It seems Simon Peter may have been left-handed as well. In the garden, when he cut off Malchus’ ear, they would probably have been facing each other. Peter swung his sword, Malchus tried to duck and lost his right ear in the glancing blow–the swing of a left-handed person.

  29. Kirkland Mason says:

    It is true that we live in a right-handed world, but left-handedness may provide advantages in numerous ways, whether in sport or warfare. The Biblical references provide some insight into the advantage taken by southpaws in these applications but there is so much more which remains untold, yet well comprehended by those taken at the disadvantage by them. The extended right hand, whether clasping another’s right hand in handshake or taking hold of the beard to exchange the customary greeting kiss, as in Joab’s case, signaled that there was no intent of malice. Joab may well have been left-handed or perhaps ambidextrous. Striking an intended death blow with the off-hand, even with the element of surprise, would be perilous at best and disastrous at its worst. Not so with Ehud, of course, who took full advantage of his left-handedness and subsequently escaped undetected.
    In baseball the right-handed batter is disadvantaged by the left-handed pitcher and vice-versa, as attested by the frequent substitutions from the bullpen in the latter innings of a close game. Most positions on the field provide advantage to the right-hander with the exception of first base, clearly the domain of the lefty who can take full advantage of the extended right catching hand.
    Boxers and martial artists can all attest to the strategic advantages afforded the southpaw combatants, and the same principal may be applied in many other sports as well. Golf is one which reveals some interesting perspectives on handedness, particularly when it comes to the hook and slice applied to the drive. Being ambidextrous can come in handy in certain situations, however how many golfers carry both right and left-handed clubs? It has been said that golf is ideally suited to the left-hander using right-handed clubs, which I found to be the case when I switched!

  30. Robert Radcliffe says:

    According to 2 Sam 20:8-10 (not explicitly, but by implication), Joab, David’s general, was also left-handed. Joab’s tribal affiliation is obscure; he may have been a member of Bnay Ammon, i.e. a non-Israelite, like many of David’s “mighty men”.
    N.B. this incident has literary parallels to the Ehud incident cited.

  31. Fay says:

    My husband is right-handed and his name is Ben…just because a person is left-handed does not mean they are less righteous!!! Old school marks differences based on physical appearance. Get some ethics on yourselves. White, black, yellow, young, old, big or small no matter what, if you’re righteous, you’re righteous!!!

  32. D. C. Smith says:

    I don’t think the analogy to baseball works, except perhaps for switch hitters. It fits perfectly well, however, for gunslingers of the old west who survived cavalry skirmishes during the civil war.

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