BIBLE HISTORY DAILY

Where Noah Landed?

From Strata in the November/December 2014 issue of BAR

Still another group is looking for Mt. Ararat, where the Bible says Noah landed after the flood. This group is looking to confirm the tradition that nearby Mt. Cudi (Judi Dagh) is really Mt. Ararat, as recorded in the Quran, Sura 11.44.

They have not uncovered much scientific evidence to date, but they do have an intriguing Assyrian relief, which may explain why a local tradition regards Mt. Cudi as Mt. Ararat.

Assyrian relief on the slopes of Mt. Cudi near the Turkish village of Sah. Photo: Courtesy Professor Ibrahim Baz of the University of Sirnak, Turkey.

This photo was taken some months ago on the slopes of Mt. Cudi near the Turkish village of Sah. The figure, who has not yet been identified, dates to a period earlier than Sennacherib (who ruled 705–681 B.C.); there is no accompanying inscription. He has his right hand raised in a gesture of reverence and holds a staff of office in his left hand.

Alan Millard, Emeritus Rankin Professor of Hebrew and Ancient Semitic Languages at the University of Liverpool, offers a possible identification for the figure: Shamshi-ilu. Millard explains that since the figure is not wearing any headdress, as might be expected of an Assyrian king, it is more likely that he represents a powerful prefect, such as Shamshi-ilu, who held sway over much of Northern Syria from c. 780 to 745 B.C. Shamshi-ilu left inscriptions in his own name at Til Barsip (modern Tell Akhmar) on the Euphrates, in which he tells of his victorious campaign against places in southeastern Turkey and the kingdom of Urartu, which would have taken him into the vicinity of Judi Dagh.


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Reliefs of Sennacherib were also found on Mt. Cudi and documented by L.W. King, an English archaeologist who taught Assyriology at King’s College in Cambridge and later worked at the British Museum.


In the free eBook Exploring Genesis: The Bible’s Ancient Traditions in Context, discover the cultural contexts for many of Israel’s earliest traditions. Explore Mesopotamian creation myths, Joseph’s relationship with Egyptian temple practices and three different takes on the location of Ur of the Chaldees, the birthplace of Abraham.


Is there any connection between Mt. Cudi and the Genesis flood account—a complex narrative in the Hebrew Bible?1

Genesis 8:4 says that after the flood waters subsided, “the ark came to rest on the mountains of Ararat.” While the Biblical text says “mountains” (plural), therefore referencing a range rather than an individual mountain, many have tried to identify the specific mountain on which Noah’s ark came to rest.

In his book The Ark before Noah: Decoding the Story of the Flood, Irving Finkel of the British Museum discusses three mountains that have flood stories affiliated with them. The first (and most famous) bears the name Mt. Ararat (Agri Dagh). The highest peak in its region, Mt. Ararat is a dormant volcano located in eastern Turkey near the border with Iran and Armenia. The second is Mt. Cudi, and the third is Mt. Nisir (Pir Omar Gudrun), where the ark rested according to the Gilgamesh Epic.

A map of the three “Ark Mountains.” Photo: From Irving Finkel, The Ark before Noah: Decoding the Story of the Flood (New York: Nan A. Talese/Doubleday, 2014).

Many expeditions have been launched to hunt for Noah’s ark over the years. While the ark itself remains elusive, we can only hope that more finds like this interesting Assyrian relief continue to surface.

——————

“Strata: Where Noah Landed?” originally appeared in the November/December 2014 issue of Biblical Archaeology Review.


In the free eBook Exploring Genesis: The Bible’s Ancient Traditions in Context, discover the cultural contexts for many of Israel’s earliest traditions. Explore Mesopotamian creation myths, Joseph’s relationship with Egyptian temple practices and three different takes on the location of Ur of the Chaldees, the birthplace of Abraham.


 

Notes:

1. See Ronald S. Hendel, “Noah, Enoch and the Flood: The Bible Meets Hollywood,” BAR, July/August 2014, and Ronald S. Hendel, “The Search for Noah’s Flood,” Bible Review, June 2003.


 

Related reading in Bible History Daily:

The Search for Noah’s Flood by Ronald S. Hendel

The Animals Went in Two by Two, According to Babylonian Ark Tablet

Rock Giants in Noah

Did This Winery Get Noah Drunk?

The Enduring Symbolism of Doves

The Curse of Ham—A New Reading in the Dead Sea Scrolls


This Bible History Daily feature was originally published on November 26, 2014.


 

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29 Responses

  1. […] Genesis 8:8—12, after the ark has landed on the mountains of Ararat, Noah sends out a dove three times to see how far the flood waters have receded. The first time it […]

  2. Jose Perez says:

    The bible gives some clues regarding the place where Noah’s ark landed. It does not tell us the exact mountain where it landed, but in Genesis 8:4 says:
    And the ark rested in the seventh month, on the seventeenth day of the month, upon the mountains of Ararat.
    It tells us the geographical location and in the next verse, in Genesis 8:5 gives us the clue: And the waters continued to abate until the tenth month; in the tenth month, on the first day of the month, the tops of the mountains were seen.
    As in the verse 4 says that in the seventh month, on the seventeenth day of the montth, the ark rested upon the mountains of Ararat, but in the verse 5 it says that in the tenth month, on the first day of the month, the tops of the mountains were seen, this means that it was neccesary 74 days after the ark have landed, for the tops of the mountains were seen. This leaves us with this questions: What mountain or place in the “mountains of Ararat”, was higher and the highest place over all the mountain in that region? The answer is obvious, Mount Ararat. So Mount Ararat, according to all this that the bible tells us, is the most likely place where Noah’s ark might have landed.

  3. Teresa says:

    I agree with Robert. Ron Wyatt is an expert and found the ark in Turkey in the 1980’s and, the government has a designated area called, “Noah’s Ark National Park”. Google it, good stuff.

  4. Ron Jones says:

    Ron Wyatt Archaelology provides plenty of proof that the ark has been discovered and explored. The Turkish government even has an observation building overlooking the site.

  5. Ron Jones says:

    Are you not familiar with the plethora of scientific evidence indicating that Ron Wyatt did, indeed, reach and explore the ark?

  6. robis says:

    interesting insights, Helen. DK what to make of this particular story, but interesting…..and good remarks from Millard, too, whatever the outcome….

  7. Helen Spalding says:

    Urartu has the same consonants as Ararat. Surely the place name in Semitic could certainly refer to the same kingdom. If this is the case, then the Ark should be located within the kingdom of Urartu. Lake Van would be a good place to settle, too.

  8. Jackson says:

    The ark hunters who look for the ark on Ararat have they ever thought how the
    animals would come down from such a gigantic mountain that’s dangerous to climb.
    Iam sure the ark came to rest in judi dagh a place that’s safer the animals to come out of after the waters left and the land was dry .Think about it?

  9. arsam says:

    I am an expert on archeology sign on stone or rock. I’m grateful I got to get help. Iran

  10. Mike says:

    People need to stop saying “Mt. Ararat.” The Bible doesn’t say this; it says “mountains of Ararat,” and there’s a big difference.

  11. Michael says:

    Just to say there has been a great response to my reply above about the dating system in the flood story where the events were actually dating back in time. I have placed the Introduction of the E book Noah’s Ark Sailed Full Circle – Travelling back in Time – on my website http://www.findoutonline.com and would like to open up a dialogue with all of those interested in the ne discovery findings. My E mail is on the website. Michael

  12. Dr John G Leslie says:

    Sir,
    I replied previously when the issue of the derivation of the Flood Account was commented on by Ronald Hendel. I do appreciate ABR’s attempts to understand the Bible better in light of some archaeology. But to reconstruct the integrity of God’s word based on man’s limited scientific observations and his limited understanding of those observations is wrong. Mr Hendel has again been referred to in this article and I will quote what he said previously:

    ” Biblical scholars will tell you that the Flood Story in Genesis 6–9 (actually stories in the plural, since there are two versions woven together in these chapters)2 derives most directly not from an actual event, but from earlier stories. The earlier stories are from ancient Mesopotamia, best known from the Gilgamesh Epic (Standard Babylonian version, c. 1100 B.C.E.) and the Atrahasis Epic (Old Babylonian, c. 1700 B.C.E.).3 In these stories we learn of a wise man named Atrahasis (later known as Utnapishtim) whom the god Enki saves from a cosmic flood by commanding him to build an ark, put all animal species on it, and save himself and his family. The ark eventually lands on a mountain called Mt. Nimush, which has been identified with Pir Omar Gudrun, an impressive mountain in the Kurdish region of Iraq, northeast of Kirkuk. (Our marines probably have a couple of Humvees parked by this mountain around now.)
    The biblical versions of this older story name the flood hero Noah, but many of the details are reminiscent of the Mesopotamian story. In his classic commentary on Genesis, E.A. Speiser concludes, ‘It is clear that Hebrew tradition must have received its material from some intermediate … source, and that it proceeded to adjust the data to its own needs and concepts.'”

    I strongly disagree with what he has stated. Again, I have a 500 page dissertation on this subject that may be viewed on my website: http://www.DefendingtheChristianFaith.org. Look under the dissertations section.

    Jesus Christ did not qualify(or limit) the Noah Flood Event, he vindicated it in Matthew 24:37-42: “But as the days of Noah were, so shall also the coming of the Son of man be.38 For as in the days that were before the flood they were eating and drinking, marrying and giving in marriage, until the day that Noe entered into the ark,39 And knew not until the flood came, and took them all away; so shall also the coming of the Son of man be.40 Then shall two be in the field; the one shall be taken, and the other left.41 Two women shall be grinding at the mill; the one shall be taken, and the other left.42 Watch therefore: for ye know not what hour your Lord doth come.” KJV online.

    The 2nd coming of Jesus Christ does not sound like a local event and yet it is compared to the event of of Noah and the Flood. Let us not compromise the power and integrity of the Bible and especially the words of Jesus Christ.

  13. Paul Ballotta says:

    The verse mentioned from the Koran 11:44 may also contain a clue:
    “Then the word went forth: ‘O earth! swallow up thy water, and O sky! Withhold (thy rain)!’ And the waters abated, and the matter was ended.”
    “The fountains of the deep and the floodgates of the sky were stopped up, and the rain from the sky was held back; the waters then receded steadily from the earth” (Genesis 8:2).
    The location of Mount Judi (Cudi Dagh) is located near the source of the Tigris River and it was believed that rivers and streams were fed from the “tehom” or “deep, abyss,” and in Sumerian myth the god of freshwaters, Enki, was the source of the Tigris.
    “In the canyons of Cudi Dagh (Jebel Judi), numerous springs are located in the Cizre region of southeastern Turkey. Springs, sinks and caves have developed in the Jurassic-Cretaceous Cudi limestone of these mountains. Runoff from springs can prolong flooding in the upper Tigris River Valley Cizre Plain Area, one of the reputed locations where the ark may have grounded if it could have negotiated the rising elevation north of Nineveh” (“Historical Genesis: From Adam to Abraham” by Richard James Fischer, p.79.
    In another reference to Noah’s ark from the Koran 54:11-12, there is a reference to these subterranean waters:
    “So We opened the gates of heaven, with water pouring forth. And We caused the earth to gush forth with springs. So the waters met (and rose) to the extent decreed.”
    “All the fountains of the great deep burst apart, and the floodgates of the sky broke open” (Genesis 7:11).
    Also the Assyrian Empire is described as an enormous tree that is fed from the subterranean waters in Ezekiel 31:4; “Waters nourished it, the deep made it grow tall, washing with its streams the place where it was planted, making its channels well up.” Then after the tree’s fall it states in Ezekiel 31:15; “Thus said the Lord God: ‘On the day it went down to Sheol, I closed the deep over it and covered it; I held back its streams, and the great waters were checked.”

  14. Kurt says:

    A Real Basis for Faith?
    Is there really a basis for believing that explorers have discovered the ark or might yet do so? Perhaps, but there seems to be even more basis for skepticism about such a find. For one thing, recall that the Bible does not say exactly where the ark alighted as the floodwaters ebbed. It merely mentions “the mountains of Ararat.”
    It is only natural for explorers and speculators to single out the highest peak in the region. However, the Scriptures do not specify that God arranged for the ark to come to rest on the very top of Mount Ararat, which is today a frigid and lofty mountain peak nearly three miles [5 km] above sea level.Remember, Noah and his family lived aboard the ark for several months after it landed. (Genesis 8:4, 5) It also seems unlikely that after disembarking, they and the many animals aboard had to climb down from a towering summit like mountaineers. Perhaps, then, the terrain where the ark landed was more accessible than some modern-day explorers imagine, yet still high enough to fit the description at Genesis 8:4, 5. And regardless of where the ark landed in the Ararat region, might it not have vanished centuries ago because of decay and scavenging?See also Flood [Noachian]
    http://wol.jw.org/en/wol/d/r1/lp-e/1200274135

  15. Dr. David Tee says:

    Please read your Bible again. It does NOT say that Noah landed ON Mt. Ararat. And Stop going to the Quran for guidance, it doesn’t have the true information.

    If you are going to do a correct search then you need to start with the correct information an dclues or you are just wasting your time.

  16. Helen Spalding says:

    So which of the two flood accounts are you going to pick for your theory? The 40 day cycle or the 150 day cycle.

    A rabbi once told me that the Bible was written by Jews. A good Jew can’t pass up a good story! Hence there are twin narratives of the creation, of the flood, and of the picking of the first monarch, Saul, for Israel.

  17. Dan Bruce says:

    It is interesting that this article says that Professor Millard offers a possible identification for the figure as Shamshi-ilu. It may be Tiglath-pileser III before 745 BCE. My New Hebrew Kings Chronology, which is based on Bible chronology instead of traditional Assyrian chronology anchored by the Bur-Sagale eclipse, requires extending the reign of Tiglath-pileser III back to 775 BCE and moving back the dates for all Assyrian kings before Tiglath-pileser III by 28 years. The dates that Professor Millard says that Shamshi-ilu ruled over northern Assyria (780-745 BCE) are essentially identical with the time period my chronology says that the reign of Tiglath-pileser III must be extended to agree with the Bible. Current Assyrian chronology requires that the Bible contains textual error in order to get its kings chronology to match Assyrian chronology. I say it is the other way around, that Assyrian chronology is incorrect before 745 BCE, and that the error happened when Rawlinson misidentified the Bur-Sagale eclipse as occurring in 762 BCE instead of the correct date, 791 BCE. When that adjustment is made to Assyrian chronology (to the reigns of kings before 745 BCE), then Assyrian, Egyptian, and Hebrew chronologies align perfectly. The Bible text does not have to be tortured to make it fit Assyrian chronology. I have laid all of my chronology out in a book, “Rethinking Ancient Near East Chronology,” if anyone is interested. See https://www.createspace.com/4867099

  18. ralph ellis says:

    The Ark of Noah is sitting upon the Giza Plateau, just under the Great Pyramid.

    These great Solar Barques (Arks) of Ra sailed the cosmic waters of Nue, from which thr Torah derived the name Nuah. And, of course, there were two Solar Arks, which were filled with animals (the Egyptan gods).

    See the book “Tempest & Exodus”.

  19. vishvas chauhan says:

    sir,

    yes i am inerested

  20. vishvas chauhan says:

    sir yes i m agree

    vishvas

  21. Michael says:

    Walter,
    I need your E mail address to send you a copy of the E book, which I published on the topic.

  22. Colette says:

    I’ll add a clue. When Noah (by any other name) sent out the Dove it came back with a twig in its beak. Noah spent further time in the Ark. It would not be at the top of any Mountain. The water receded between the return of the twig and the exit from the Ark. Happy hunting.

  23. Walter Dowdy says:

    Yes Mike, send me the formula, plus your research. THANKS

  24. Michael says:

    Nehemie, Can you send me your E mail address to [email protected] and I will send you the project paper on the findings. It is around 20 pages long and so too large to post here on this blog. Michael

  25. Néhémie says:

    @Michael, I surely do.

  26. Michael says:

    The story of Noah’s ark in Genesis was a fable that the biblical priests used to insert a numerical puzzle that related to the heavens. The puzzle is in the dating system and it began where it stated the flood started on the 17th day of the second month and it rained for forty days and forty nights and the waters rose for 150 days. The ark then rested on Mount Ararat on the 17th day of the seventh month. A biblical month was thirty days long and therefore it was 150 day from when the flood started to the 17th day of the seventh month but the waters did not have time to recede so how could the ark rest on Mount Ararat?
    The answer to the puzzle is to date events back in time and the timing works out where there is time for the waters to recede. The priests employed a formula withe the puzzle and I have worked out that formula and it relates to measuring time with respect to what is called star or sidereal time. Would anyone like to hear more about this formula and why the priests used it to convey a message with travelling back in time? t

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29 Responses

  1. […] Genesis 8:8—12, after the ark has landed on the mountains of Ararat, Noah sends out a dove three times to see how far the flood waters have receded. The first time it […]

  2. Jose Perez says:

    The bible gives some clues regarding the place where Noah’s ark landed. It does not tell us the exact mountain where it landed, but in Genesis 8:4 says:
    And the ark rested in the seventh month, on the seventeenth day of the month, upon the mountains of Ararat.
    It tells us the geographical location and in the next verse, in Genesis 8:5 gives us the clue: And the waters continued to abate until the tenth month; in the tenth month, on the first day of the month, the tops of the mountains were seen.
    As in the verse 4 says that in the seventh month, on the seventeenth day of the montth, the ark rested upon the mountains of Ararat, but in the verse 5 it says that in the tenth month, on the first day of the month, the tops of the mountains were seen, this means that it was neccesary 74 days after the ark have landed, for the tops of the mountains were seen. This leaves us with this questions: What mountain or place in the “mountains of Ararat”, was higher and the highest place over all the mountain in that region? The answer is obvious, Mount Ararat. So Mount Ararat, according to all this that the bible tells us, is the most likely place where Noah’s ark might have landed.

  3. Teresa says:

    I agree with Robert. Ron Wyatt is an expert and found the ark in Turkey in the 1980’s and, the government has a designated area called, “Noah’s Ark National Park”. Google it, good stuff.

  4. Ron Jones says:

    Ron Wyatt Archaelology provides plenty of proof that the ark has been discovered and explored. The Turkish government even has an observation building overlooking the site.

  5. Ron Jones says:

    Are you not familiar with the plethora of scientific evidence indicating that Ron Wyatt did, indeed, reach and explore the ark?

  6. robis says:

    interesting insights, Helen. DK what to make of this particular story, but interesting…..and good remarks from Millard, too, whatever the outcome….

  7. Helen Spalding says:

    Urartu has the same consonants as Ararat. Surely the place name in Semitic could certainly refer to the same kingdom. If this is the case, then the Ark should be located within the kingdom of Urartu. Lake Van would be a good place to settle, too.

  8. Jackson says:

    The ark hunters who look for the ark on Ararat have they ever thought how the
    animals would come down from such a gigantic mountain that’s dangerous to climb.
    Iam sure the ark came to rest in judi dagh a place that’s safer the animals to come out of after the waters left and the land was dry .Think about it?

  9. arsam says:

    I am an expert on archeology sign on stone or rock. I’m grateful I got to get help. Iran

  10. Mike says:

    People need to stop saying “Mt. Ararat.” The Bible doesn’t say this; it says “mountains of Ararat,” and there’s a big difference.

  11. Michael says:

    Just to say there has been a great response to my reply above about the dating system in the flood story where the events were actually dating back in time. I have placed the Introduction of the E book Noah’s Ark Sailed Full Circle – Travelling back in Time – on my website http://www.findoutonline.com and would like to open up a dialogue with all of those interested in the ne discovery findings. My E mail is on the website. Michael

  12. Dr John G Leslie says:

    Sir,
    I replied previously when the issue of the derivation of the Flood Account was commented on by Ronald Hendel. I do appreciate ABR’s attempts to understand the Bible better in light of some archaeology. But to reconstruct the integrity of God’s word based on man’s limited scientific observations and his limited understanding of those observations is wrong. Mr Hendel has again been referred to in this article and I will quote what he said previously:

    ” Biblical scholars will tell you that the Flood Story in Genesis 6–9 (actually stories in the plural, since there are two versions woven together in these chapters)2 derives most directly not from an actual event, but from earlier stories. The earlier stories are from ancient Mesopotamia, best known from the Gilgamesh Epic (Standard Babylonian version, c. 1100 B.C.E.) and the Atrahasis Epic (Old Babylonian, c. 1700 B.C.E.).3 In these stories we learn of a wise man named Atrahasis (later known as Utnapishtim) whom the god Enki saves from a cosmic flood by commanding him to build an ark, put all animal species on it, and save himself and his family. The ark eventually lands on a mountain called Mt. Nimush, which has been identified with Pir Omar Gudrun, an impressive mountain in the Kurdish region of Iraq, northeast of Kirkuk. (Our marines probably have a couple of Humvees parked by this mountain around now.)
    The biblical versions of this older story name the flood hero Noah, but many of the details are reminiscent of the Mesopotamian story. In his classic commentary on Genesis, E.A. Speiser concludes, ‘It is clear that Hebrew tradition must have received its material from some intermediate … source, and that it proceeded to adjust the data to its own needs and concepts.'”

    I strongly disagree with what he has stated. Again, I have a 500 page dissertation on this subject that may be viewed on my website: http://www.DefendingtheChristianFaith.org. Look under the dissertations section.

    Jesus Christ did not qualify(or limit) the Noah Flood Event, he vindicated it in Matthew 24:37-42: “But as the days of Noah were, so shall also the coming of the Son of man be.38 For as in the days that were before the flood they were eating and drinking, marrying and giving in marriage, until the day that Noe entered into the ark,39 And knew not until the flood came, and took them all away; so shall also the coming of the Son of man be.40 Then shall two be in the field; the one shall be taken, and the other left.41 Two women shall be grinding at the mill; the one shall be taken, and the other left.42 Watch therefore: for ye know not what hour your Lord doth come.” KJV online.

    The 2nd coming of Jesus Christ does not sound like a local event and yet it is compared to the event of of Noah and the Flood. Let us not compromise the power and integrity of the Bible and especially the words of Jesus Christ.

  13. Paul Ballotta says:

    The verse mentioned from the Koran 11:44 may also contain a clue:
    “Then the word went forth: ‘O earth! swallow up thy water, and O sky! Withhold (thy rain)!’ And the waters abated, and the matter was ended.”
    “The fountains of the deep and the floodgates of the sky were stopped up, and the rain from the sky was held back; the waters then receded steadily from the earth” (Genesis 8:2).
    The location of Mount Judi (Cudi Dagh) is located near the source of the Tigris River and it was believed that rivers and streams were fed from the “tehom” or “deep, abyss,” and in Sumerian myth the god of freshwaters, Enki, was the source of the Tigris.
    “In the canyons of Cudi Dagh (Jebel Judi), numerous springs are located in the Cizre region of southeastern Turkey. Springs, sinks and caves have developed in the Jurassic-Cretaceous Cudi limestone of these mountains. Runoff from springs can prolong flooding in the upper Tigris River Valley Cizre Plain Area, one of the reputed locations where the ark may have grounded if it could have negotiated the rising elevation north of Nineveh” (“Historical Genesis: From Adam to Abraham” by Richard James Fischer, p.79.
    In another reference to Noah’s ark from the Koran 54:11-12, there is a reference to these subterranean waters:
    “So We opened the gates of heaven, with water pouring forth. And We caused the earth to gush forth with springs. So the waters met (and rose) to the extent decreed.”
    “All the fountains of the great deep burst apart, and the floodgates of the sky broke open” (Genesis 7:11).
    Also the Assyrian Empire is described as an enormous tree that is fed from the subterranean waters in Ezekiel 31:4; “Waters nourished it, the deep made it grow tall, washing with its streams the place where it was planted, making its channels well up.” Then after the tree’s fall it states in Ezekiel 31:15; “Thus said the Lord God: ‘On the day it went down to Sheol, I closed the deep over it and covered it; I held back its streams, and the great waters were checked.”

  14. Kurt says:

    A Real Basis for Faith?
    Is there really a basis for believing that explorers have discovered the ark or might yet do so? Perhaps, but there seems to be even more basis for skepticism about such a find. For one thing, recall that the Bible does not say exactly where the ark alighted as the floodwaters ebbed. It merely mentions “the mountains of Ararat.”
    It is only natural for explorers and speculators to single out the highest peak in the region. However, the Scriptures do not specify that God arranged for the ark to come to rest on the very top of Mount Ararat, which is today a frigid and lofty mountain peak nearly three miles [5 km] above sea level.Remember, Noah and his family lived aboard the ark for several months after it landed. (Genesis 8:4, 5) It also seems unlikely that after disembarking, they and the many animals aboard had to climb down from a towering summit like mountaineers. Perhaps, then, the terrain where the ark landed was more accessible than some modern-day explorers imagine, yet still high enough to fit the description at Genesis 8:4, 5. And regardless of where the ark landed in the Ararat region, might it not have vanished centuries ago because of decay and scavenging?See also Flood [Noachian]
    http://wol.jw.org/en/wol/d/r1/lp-e/1200274135

  15. Dr. David Tee says:

    Please read your Bible again. It does NOT say that Noah landed ON Mt. Ararat. And Stop going to the Quran for guidance, it doesn’t have the true information.

    If you are going to do a correct search then you need to start with the correct information an dclues or you are just wasting your time.

  16. Helen Spalding says:

    So which of the two flood accounts are you going to pick for your theory? The 40 day cycle or the 150 day cycle.

    A rabbi once told me that the Bible was written by Jews. A good Jew can’t pass up a good story! Hence there are twin narratives of the creation, of the flood, and of the picking of the first monarch, Saul, for Israel.

  17. Dan Bruce says:

    It is interesting that this article says that Professor Millard offers a possible identification for the figure as Shamshi-ilu. It may be Tiglath-pileser III before 745 BCE. My New Hebrew Kings Chronology, which is based on Bible chronology instead of traditional Assyrian chronology anchored by the Bur-Sagale eclipse, requires extending the reign of Tiglath-pileser III back to 775 BCE and moving back the dates for all Assyrian kings before Tiglath-pileser III by 28 years. The dates that Professor Millard says that Shamshi-ilu ruled over northern Assyria (780-745 BCE) are essentially identical with the time period my chronology says that the reign of Tiglath-pileser III must be extended to agree with the Bible. Current Assyrian chronology requires that the Bible contains textual error in order to get its kings chronology to match Assyrian chronology. I say it is the other way around, that Assyrian chronology is incorrect before 745 BCE, and that the error happened when Rawlinson misidentified the Bur-Sagale eclipse as occurring in 762 BCE instead of the correct date, 791 BCE. When that adjustment is made to Assyrian chronology (to the reigns of kings before 745 BCE), then Assyrian, Egyptian, and Hebrew chronologies align perfectly. The Bible text does not have to be tortured to make it fit Assyrian chronology. I have laid all of my chronology out in a book, “Rethinking Ancient Near East Chronology,” if anyone is interested. See https://www.createspace.com/4867099

  18. ralph ellis says:

    The Ark of Noah is sitting upon the Giza Plateau, just under the Great Pyramid.

    These great Solar Barques (Arks) of Ra sailed the cosmic waters of Nue, from which thr Torah derived the name Nuah. And, of course, there were two Solar Arks, which were filled with animals (the Egyptan gods).

    See the book “Tempest & Exodus”.

  19. vishvas chauhan says:

    sir,

    yes i am inerested

  20. vishvas chauhan says:

    sir yes i m agree

    vishvas

  21. Michael says:

    Walter,
    I need your E mail address to send you a copy of the E book, which I published on the topic.

  22. Colette says:

    I’ll add a clue. When Noah (by any other name) sent out the Dove it came back with a twig in its beak. Noah spent further time in the Ark. It would not be at the top of any Mountain. The water receded between the return of the twig and the exit from the Ark. Happy hunting.

  23. Walter Dowdy says:

    Yes Mike, send me the formula, plus your research. THANKS

  24. Michael says:

    Nehemie, Can you send me your E mail address to [email protected] and I will send you the project paper on the findings. It is around 20 pages long and so too large to post here on this blog. Michael

  25. Néhémie says:

    @Michael, I surely do.

  26. Michael says:

    The story of Noah’s ark in Genesis was a fable that the biblical priests used to insert a numerical puzzle that related to the heavens. The puzzle is in the dating system and it began where it stated the flood started on the 17th day of the second month and it rained for forty days and forty nights and the waters rose for 150 days. The ark then rested on Mount Ararat on the 17th day of the seventh month. A biblical month was thirty days long and therefore it was 150 day from when the flood started to the 17th day of the seventh month but the waters did not have time to recede so how could the ark rest on Mount Ararat?
    The answer to the puzzle is to date events back in time and the timing works out where there is time for the waters to recede. The priests employed a formula withe the puzzle and I have worked out that formula and it relates to measuring time with respect to what is called star or sidereal time. Would anyone like to hear more about this formula and why the priests used it to convey a message with travelling back in time? t

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