BIBLE HISTORY DAILY

Evidence of Historical Blood Vengeance Found in Jerusalem Cave

Archaeology news

historical-blood-vengeance-skull

Left to right: Researchers Boaz Zissu, Yossi Nagar, and Haim Cohen inspect the skull discovered in the Jerusalem Hills. They believe this ancient skull displays evidence of historical blood vengeance. Photo: Israel Antiquities Authority.

An archaeological survey in the hills of Jerusalem proved to be fruitful when researchers came across human remains suggesting the earliest evidence of historical blood vengeance.

Conducted under the direction of Boaz Zissu, Professor of Archaeology and Head of the Martin (Szusz) Department of Land of Israel Studies and Archaeology at Bar-Ilan University, the survey exposed a partially intact human skull and palm bones. These remains were examined by Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) anthropologist Dr. Yossi Nagar and Dr. Haim Cohen of the National Center for Forensic Medicine and Tel Aviv University.

Dating to the 10th–11th centuries C.E., the skull and palm bones were identified as having belonged to a male between the ages of 25 and 40.

In an IAA press release, the researchers relay that “the skull cap shows signs of two traumatic injuries that eventually healed—evidence of previous violence experienced by the victim—as well as a small cut-mark caused close to the time of death, and a blow by a sword that caused certain and immediate death.”


The free eBook Life in the Ancient World guides you through craft centers in ancient Jerusalem, family structure across Israel and articles on ancient practices—from dining to makeup—across the Mediterranean world.

Further, a morphological examination of the skull reveals that there is a strong resemblance to the Bedouin, a group of nomadic peoples who have historically lived in the deserts of the Middle East and, according to the researchers, “apparently had a tradition of blood vengeance.” At the time this ancient man was killed, the researchers say, a Bedouin population from Jordan and northern Arabia was known to have lived in the Jerusalem Hills, around the location of the cave in which the skeletal remains were discovered.

historical-blood-vengeance-cave

The cave in the Jerusalem Hills where the skull was found. Photo: Prof. Boaz Zissu, Bar-Ilan University.

Lastly, the researchers rest their case for historical blood vengeance on a modern tale of revenge. As argued in the press release:

A text from the beginning of the 20th century tells the story of a case of revenge, during which the murderer presented his family with the skull and right hand of the victim in order to prove the carrying out of a commandment. These are precisely the parts of the body that were discovered in the present case. Since this is a person who was previously involved in violent incidents who then died from the fatal blow, the researchers say it can be concluded that the earliest evidence of blood vengeance has been discovered.


The free eBook Life in the Ancient World guides you through craft centers in ancient Jerusalem, family structure across Israel and articles on ancient practices—from dining to makeup—across the Mediterranean world.

Ruthie Flynn is an intern at the Biblical Archaeology Society.


7 Responses

  1. Jacob Garbuz says:

    “Honor” and blood vengeance has been part of Bedouin culture from thousands of years back to today. However, in Israelite and Jewish culture, “revenge is mine, sayeth the Lord” prevails. If you fight, it has to be in court. When Jews take revenge, it’s to clean you out in court, and not split open your skull or cut off your hand. But blood vengeance goes back to Cain and Abel and Israelite culture was heavily influenced by the written word and such stories from their scribes. That everything has to be done by law, not by impulse and rage. From Israelite beliefs came the hope for mercy, repentance and forgiveness. God did not kill Cain.

  2. ilan bergman says:

    How bout the possibility that the poor person got mugged or was handed his butt during the commission of a crime. Either way who cares about Bedouins. This would have been more interesting if it had been found on any of the sites of the 5 cities of refuge set aside for unintentional murders, kind of protective custody if it was determined that it was an accident but the avenger just would not accept anything short of retribution.

  3. Eugene says:

    WOw! What an eye opening discovery. I’ve contemplated the death of Jezabel whose remains were only that of head, hands and feet. Your story does give some insight.
    Gracias

  4. DOROTHY WILSON says:

    I appreciate biblical archaeology. I’ve been waiting for my snail-mail B.A. magazine for some time. I suppose I ought to call. I hope the magazine, both online and off line, will have great success. I wonder sometimes if the name of the magazine needs to be changed to reflect the varied interests of general archaeology in the area, not just biblical? Correct me if I am wrong.

    1. Helen Spalding says:

      Recall, that we got a double portion last edition. Being patient is tough when we are talking abt BAR in the mailbox! 😀

  5. Virginia Bailey says:

    I do hope the State of Israel continues to be able to bring so much knowledge about the beginnings of our Judeo/Christian culture to the forefront. I wish the other cultures in the area would join them in finding common goals and move forward together researching their common pasts, rather than wasting so much time creating more blood vengeance.

  6. Mary L. Gast says:

    Would like your historical feedback on Middle East area

Write a Reply or Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


7 Responses

  1. Jacob Garbuz says:

    “Honor” and blood vengeance has been part of Bedouin culture from thousands of years back to today. However, in Israelite and Jewish culture, “revenge is mine, sayeth the Lord” prevails. If you fight, it has to be in court. When Jews take revenge, it’s to clean you out in court, and not split open your skull or cut off your hand. But blood vengeance goes back to Cain and Abel and Israelite culture was heavily influenced by the written word and such stories from their scribes. That everything has to be done by law, not by impulse and rage. From Israelite beliefs came the hope for mercy, repentance and forgiveness. God did not kill Cain.

  2. ilan bergman says:

    How bout the possibility that the poor person got mugged or was handed his butt during the commission of a crime. Either way who cares about Bedouins. This would have been more interesting if it had been found on any of the sites of the 5 cities of refuge set aside for unintentional murders, kind of protective custody if it was determined that it was an accident but the avenger just would not accept anything short of retribution.

  3. Eugene says:

    WOw! What an eye opening discovery. I’ve contemplated the death of Jezabel whose remains were only that of head, hands and feet. Your story does give some insight.
    Gracias

  4. DOROTHY WILSON says:

    I appreciate biblical archaeology. I’ve been waiting for my snail-mail B.A. magazine for some time. I suppose I ought to call. I hope the magazine, both online and off line, will have great success. I wonder sometimes if the name of the magazine needs to be changed to reflect the varied interests of general archaeology in the area, not just biblical? Correct me if I am wrong.

    1. Helen Spalding says:

      Recall, that we got a double portion last edition. Being patient is tough when we are talking abt BAR in the mailbox! 😀

  5. Virginia Bailey says:

    I do hope the State of Israel continues to be able to bring so much knowledge about the beginnings of our Judeo/Christian culture to the forefront. I wish the other cultures in the area would join them in finding common goals and move forward together researching their common pasts, rather than wasting so much time creating more blood vengeance.

  6. Mary L. Gast says:

    Would like your historical feedback on Middle East area

Write a Reply or Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


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