News

News

canaanite-sidon-burial

Jun 9

What Happened to the Canaanites?

By: Robin Ngo

For the first time, researchers have conducted DNA sequencing on ancient Canaanite skeletons and have determined where the Canaanites’ descendants can be found today.

May 18

Vatican Honors Machaerus Excavator

By: Megan Sauter

Professor Győző Vörös, member of the Hungarian Academy of Arts and frequent BAR author, has received the highest pontifical award for his archaeological work at […]

Apr 29

The Expulsion of the Hyksos

By: Noah Wiener

In the 16th century B.C.E., Ahmose I overthrew the Hyksos and initiated the 18th Dynasty and the New Kingdom of Egypt. Recent archaeological discoveries at Tel Habuwa shed new light on Ahmose’s campaign.

Abydos Ramses II Offering Gifts to Gods

Mar 29

The Pharaohs’ Golden Parade

By: Jonathan Laden

On April 3rd, 22 royal mummies are being transferred with great fanfare from Cairo's Egyptian Museum to Fustat's National Museum of Egyptian Civilization It is The Pharaohs' Golden Parade where the main celebrities are all long dead. Egypt is holding the procession to transfer the mummies of 18 pharaohs and 4 queens to their new permanent home at the National Museum of Egyptian Civilization in Fustat.

hezekiah-bulla

Mar 3

King Hezekiah in the Bible: Royal Seal of Hezekiah Comes to Light

By: Robin Ngo

For the first time, the royal seal of King Hezekiah in the Bible has been found in an archaeological excavation.

et-tell

Feb 17

Where Is Biblical Bethsaida?

By: Samuel DeWitt Pfister

The ancient village of Bethsaida frequently mentioned in the Gospels is believed to be located on the northern shore of the Sea of Galilee, but where precisely the abandoned city lies remains a fiercely-debated question among scholars.

arad-ostracon

Nov 11

Ancient Military Correspondence: Send Wine

By: Robin Ngo

Send wine: A newly deciphered letter from Israel’s Negev desert describes an exchange of supplies between two Judahite military officers.

Nov 4

Çatalhöyük Mural: The Earliest Representation of a Volcanic Eruption?

By: Noah Wiener

In the early 1960s, archaeologist James Mellaart uncovered a mural at Çatalhöyük, the world’s largest and best-preserved Neolithic site, which he interpreted to represent a volcanic eruption.

king-tut

Oct 14

Epilepsy, Tutankhamun and Monotheism

By: Noah Wiener

Tutankhamun died at a young age with a feminine physique. His closest relatives all shared similar features and fates. Imperial College London surgeon Hutan Ashrafian suggests that the royal family may have had an inherited disorder: frontal lobe epilepsy.

mesha-stele

Sep 30

Scholars Identify Biblical King Balak on the Mesha Stele

By: Robin Ngo

Scholars have proposed a new reading of the Mesha Stele: one line refers not to the “House of David,” but to the Moab king Balak from the story of Balaam in the Bible.