New Testament

New Testament

messianic-apocalypse-scroll

Jun 18

The Dead Sea Scrolls and the New Testament

By: Megan Sauter

What do the Dead Sea Scrolls say about Jesus? What do they say about the world in which Jesus lived? In BAR, James C. VanderKam examines the overlap between the Dead Sea Scrolls and the New Testament.

The Apostle Paul by Rembrandt van Rijn (c. 1657). The apostle sits composing his letter, contemplating the sword that stands before him. Public Domain, Creative Commons Zero.

Jun 12

Paul’s Thorn in the Flesh

By: John Drummond

One of the apostle Paul’s most-discussed passages occurs in 2 Corinthians 12. In the span of ten verses, Paul alludes to not one but two […]

Mary Simeon Anna

Jun 2

Mary, Simeon or Anna: Who First Recognized Jesus as Messiah?

By: Ben Witherington III

Who was the first person to truly recognize Jesus as the messiah and understand the implications? Biblical scholar Ben Witherington III takes a close look at the account given in Luke, and sheds some light on what the Biblical narrative has to say about who was the first to recognize Jesus as the messiah.

May 9

Tabitha in the Bible

By: Robin Gallaher Branch

Biblical studies scholar Robin Gallaher Branch explores Luke’s depiction of a woman set on doing good for the poor and serving her friends, the widows, for whom she makes robes and clothing.

Perga Inscription

May 2

Who Were the Galatians in the Bible?

By: Megan Sauter

Galatia refers to a region in north central Turkey; Ankara, the capital of modern Turkey, was once a major Galatian city (Ancyra). The name of Galatia is derived from the 20,000 Gauls who settled in the region in 278 B.C.E. More than two centuries later, in 25 B.C.E., the area became a Roman province and was extended to the south. In Paul’s day, the new province included the regions of Pisidia, Phrygia, and Lycaonia. Scholars often refer to these new, southern regions as “south Galatia” and to geographic Galatia as “north Galatia.”

Westward view over the harbor at Fair Havens, on the southern coast of Crete. Photo courtesy of Mark Wilson

Apr 24

The Pax Romana and Maritime Travel

By: Jennifer Drummond

The Pax Romana, or “Roman Peace,” is what many often term the Roman Empire’s unprecedented period of peace and economic prosperity between 27 BCE and […]

Section of Bodmer Papyrus 66. Public domain.

Apr 15

What Is Biblical Greek?

By: John Drummond

Biblical Greek, as it is commonly known, is a dialect of the ancient Greek language known as hēkoinēdialektos (“the common dialect”) or Koine Greek. This […]

Roman Catacomb Painting at the Catacombs of Santa Priscilla

Apr 4

The Last Days of Jesus: A Final “Messianic” Meal

By: James Tabor

On Wednesday Jesus began to make plans for Passover. He sent two of his disciples into the city to prepare a large second-­story guest room where he could gather secretly and safely with his inner group.

Herod Tomb

Mar 24

How Was Jesus’ Tomb Sealed?

By: Megan Sauter

What kind of stone sealed the tomb of Jesus? Was it a round (disk-shaped) stone or a square (cork-shaped) stone? While both kinds of blocking stones are attested in Jerusalem tombs from the time of Jesus, square (cork-shaped) stones are much, much more common than round (disk-shaped) ones.

Giotto adoration of the magi

Mar 23

Where Was Jesus Born?

By: Megan Sauter

If Jesus was born in Bethlehem, why is he called a Nazorean and a Galilean throughout the New Testament? Philip J. King addresses this question in his Biblical Views column.