Saving Dead Sea Could Harm Archaeological Sites

Bible and archaeology news

According to a new report, a proposed project that would pump nearly 40 billion cubic feet of water per year from the Red Sea into the Dead Sea would likely cause significant damage to major archaeological sites in the Wadi Aravah, including the ancient copper mining site of Wadi Faynan.* Though many see the proposed Red-Dead Water Conveyance Project as a possible solution to the rapidly declining water level of the Dead Sea, the World Bank-led study identified several archaeological sites within the Aravah that could be permanently damaged from the construction of workers’ camps, access roads, and maintenance facilities associated with the project. To limit damage to antiquities sites, the study proposed that construction companies impose restrictions on the movement of vehicles, control and monitor the dumping of waste, and educate their workers about the importance of archaeological sites.

Saving Dead Sea Could Harm Archaeological Sites

According to a new report, a proposed project that would pump nearly 40 billion cubic feet of water per year from the Red Sea into the Dead Sea would likely cause significant damage to major archaeological sites in the Wadi Aravah, including the ancient copper mining site of Wadi Faynan.

 

* See Mohammad Najjar and Thomas Levy, “Condemned to the Mines,” BAR, November/December 2011.

Posted in Biblical Archaeology Sites, Cultural Heritage, News.

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  1. Harry says

    A rescue dig is certainly recommended, absolutely necessary. However, it the choice is stark, losing the sites or allowing the “Dead” Sea to truly die, my vote is with the Red-Dead Canal.


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