Prominent Archaeologists Launch New Academic Journal

The title Journal of Eastern Mediterranean Archaeology and Heritage Studies (JEMAHS) may not exactly roll off the tongue, but the new quarterly publication from Penn State Press has a big mission to fulfill and two very qualified scholars at the helm.

JEMAHS is under the joint leadership of editors Ann E. Killebrew and Sandra A. Scham. Killebrew, associate professor of archaeology at Penn State, is currently codirector of the Tel Akko Total Archaeology project and field school and director of the Bay of Iskenderun (Turkey) landscape archaeology survey. She is past editor of Near Eastern Archaeology (NEA), published by the American Schools of Oriental Research (ASOR). Scham is an anthropological archaeologist who teaches at Catholic University and is a researcher at the University of Maryland. She is also past editor of NEA and has worked at several sites in Israel, Jordan and Turkey.


Killebrew

Scham


According to the journal’s fact sheet, JEMAHS “is devoted to traditional, anthropological, social and applied archaeologies of the Eastern Mediterranean, encompassing both prehistoric and historic periods,” including recent history. Rather than focusing on a particular archaeological discipline, the editors will take an inclusive approach, featuring research on topics as varied as excavation and survey results, ethnoarchaeology, conservation and heritage studies, and new technologies—from throughout the Eastern Mediterranean region.

Although a peer-reviewed academic journal, JEMAHS “also aims to publish accessible, jargon-free, readable, color-illustrated articles that will be informative for professional and nonprofessional readers.”

Single issues will run individuals $28 each; a year’s subscription is available for $80 (print or online) or $112 (print and online). The first issue of JEMAHS was published in February 2013.

Visit the Penn State University Press website

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  1. Additional says

    Why people still make use of to read news papers when in
    this technological world everything is existing on net?


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