City of David Archaeologists Unearth Late Bronze Age Egyptian Scarab

Bible and Archaeology News

Israeli archaeologists working at the City of David excavations in Jerusalem recently uncovered a rare 13th century B.C.E. Egyptian scarab. The scarab dates to Egypt’s 19th dynasty, which was marked by military campaigns and conquests in Canaan. According to dig directors Eli Shukron and Joe Uziel, the artifact is the first of its kind in the City of David excavations, and it serves as a material reflection of the Egyptian presence in Israel during the period.

The soft gray stone Egyptian scarab was used as a stamp seal to close and sign documents. It is less than one inch long, and features an imprinted image of a duck along with the name of the sun god Amon-Ra in hieroglyphics. The April find date nearly missed Passover, the holiday commemorating the Hebrew Exodus from Egypt. While it remains a highly debated subject, some scholars have posited a 13th century B.C.E. date for the Exodus;* the recently excavated scarab serves as a reminder of the relations and conflicts between the Hebrews and Egyptians during the era.

City of David Archaeologists Unearth Late Bronze Age Egyptian Scarab

Israeli archaeologists working at the City of David excavations in Jerusalem recently uncovered a rare 13th century B.C.E. Egyptian scarab.

 

Read more about the Jerusalem Scarab.

* For more information on the archaeology of the Exodus, see Hoffmeier, James K. “Out of Egypt.” Biblical Archaeology Review, Jan/Feb 2007.

Posted in Artifacts and the Bible, Exodus, Jerusalem, News.

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  1. warren says

    Which Exodus ? The first (Joseph) or second (Moses) ?

  2. Scott says

    The Bible/Torah shows 1453 BC as the date they 1st settled in Canaan. 13th century (1200s BC) is well into the Judges period. Most like to ignore Bible chronology but tree ring dating based on Thera explosion at 1628 BC does suggest that Egyptian chrono is off short by about 150 years. There was a dark period in Egypt in the 20th dynasty where much info was lost.

  3. Ann-Louise says

    This phrase from your second paragraph, “the name of the sun god Amon-Ra in hieroglyphics.” should properly read “the name of the sun god Amon-Ra in hieroglyphs.”

Continuing the Discussion

  1. City of David Archaeologists Unearth Late Bronze Age Egyptian … | فيس اونلاين linked to this post on April 19, 2012

    [...] post: City of David Archaeologists Unearth Late Bronze Age Egyptian … هذه التدوينة نُشرت ضمن التصنيف اخبار بواسطة 7amdy وتحمل [...]

  2. Quora linked to this post on October 17, 2012

    What archeological evidence exists to show that the Hebrews were ever slaves or even just lived in Egypt?…

    I’m no expert, but I enjoy reading the debates and haggling about what constitutes good evidence in Biblical Archaeology Review. Some of the physical evidence is fun to ponder. Speaking of which, I did a quick search on the keywords Egypt Hebrew, and …

  3. Are the first 7 books of the Bible really just folklore? - Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Atheism, God, Universe, Science, Spirituality, Faith, Evidence - Page 8 - City-Data Forum linked to this post on March 14, 2013

    [...] Originally Posted by AREQUIPA Just think it's all part of God's plan and welcome us as giving you a chance to earn extra brownie points by disregarding all the arguments we make and adhere to the faith. You do have a point here. If the Bible account was supposed to be accurate, then it couldn't be true as there would be no land of the Philistines to avoid (13.17) as they didn't settle in the Gaza area until after the the Mernepthah stele which mentions defeat of Israel. However, you could say that it mentions the land that was Philistia in the time the Bible was written but at that time was part of Egypt. That said, there really isn't any archaeological evidence for the Exodus. The Tempest stele, the Hyksos, none of those relate to the Exodus at all. Neither do the attempts to trace the path of Moses' Jews across TWO gulfs to Saudi Arabia work too well. We may get a chance to consider the Jebl Laws site and the claimed 'Calf altar' yet again. It doesn't help a lot to refer to miracles being by definition 'unworkable'; it is the Exodus event itself that doesn't have any really good evidence, the Moses story is so clearly lifted from the childhood story of Sargon of Akkad – just as the Flood was lifted from the Babylonian Flood -story, the history is making it difficult to fit into the Egyptian history timescale and the archaeology is indicating that the Israelites appeared in Canaan quite late on when the States of Edom, Ammon and Moab appeared. That, not the miracles,is the real problem with Exodus. How do you explain that almost every major culture around the world has a Flood myth sharing several elements in common with the Genesis account? It is quite possible that these other myths originated after the tower of Babel incident and evolved through oral tradition. You have no proof that the Moses story was copied from Sargon. Archaeological finds are constantly being discovered so you don't have the right to blow off the Exodus story as fiction just because we haven't uncovered the evidence yet. Here's one interesting find from last year: City of David Archaeologists Unearth Late Bronze Age Egyptian Scarab – Biblical Archaeology So… [...]


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