Video: The Exodus and the Bible: What Was Known, What Was Remembered, What Was Forgotten

William Dever discusses text & memory at UCSD's recent Out of Egypt conference

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University of Arizona and Lycoming College scholar William Dever delivered the lecture “The Exodus and the Bible: What Was Known, What Was Remembered, What Was Forgotten” at the recent Out of Egypt: Israel’s Exodus Between Text and Memory, History and Imagination conference hosted by Calit2’s Qualcomm Institute at UC San Diego. Watch the full lecture video below or click here for more information on the conference, including dozens of additional video lectures.

Lecture video courtesy of conference host Thomas E. Levy, distinguished professor and Norma Kershaw Chair in the Archaeology of Ancient Israel and Neighboring Lands at UCSD. All videos originally published on the Out of Egypt: Israel’s Exodus Between Text and Memory, History and Imagination website, which features additional Exodus research and more information on the UCSD conference.
 


 
In the DVD lecture series How Archaeology Illuminates the Bible: From the Patriarchs to the Babylonian Destruction William G. Dever gives eight lectures created specially for readers of Biblical Archaeology Review. Each is a gem. The lectures are illustrated with pictures, maps and plans from Professor Dever’s personal photos as well as photos from leading archaeological photographers. This course is for the beginner as well as the seasoned reader of Biblical Archaeology Review and for everyone in between. It is understandable for those coming to the subject for the first time and newly insightful for the advanced student.

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  1. Swaddle says

    Great lecture, thanks for sharing.

  2. Kai says

    The speaker makes assumptions based on the limits of archaeological discoveries. It is no secret that textual longevity and especially in the context of the Abrahamic traditions, keeps close to correctness and what was perceived as true. Take the Dead Sea scrolls as an undeniable evidence of this. The speaker has imputed his own bias, as no way archaeological discovering has completed its work and probably never can. I don’t think the lecture was in any way near “great”. Its one man’s view as opposed to an amazing literary strict tradition that is fraught with details, prophetic utterances and life-changing occurrences as a result, with miraculous individual and group experiences.


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