Has the Childhood Home of Jesus Been Found?

Jesus’ home in Nazareth

This Bible History Daily feature was originally published in March 2015. It has been updated.—Ed.


 
house-nazareth

This very well could be the childhood home of Jesus. It doesn’t look inviting, but this rock-hewn courtyard house was quite likely Jesus’ home in Nazareth. The recent excavation by Ken Dark and the Nazareth Archaeological Project revealed evidence suggesting this is where Jesus was raised—or at the least the place venerated as such by the Byzantine period. Photo: Ken Dark.

The childhood home of Jesus may have been found underneath the Sisters of Nazareth Convent in Nazareth, Israel, according to archaeologist Ken Dark.

The excavation site located beneath the convent has been known since 1880, but it was never professionally excavated until the Nazareth Archaeological Project began its work in 2006. In “Has Jesus’ Nazareth House Been Found?” in the March/April 2015 issue of BAR, Ken Dark, the director of the Nazareth Archaeological Project, not only describes the remains of the home itself, but explores the evidence that suggests that this is the place where Jesus spent his formative years—or at least the place regarded in the Byzantine period as the childhood home of Jesus.

The excavation revealed a first-century “courtyard house” that was partially hewn from naturally occurring rock and partially constructed with rock-built walls. Many of the home’s original features are still intact, including doors and windows. Also found at the site were tombs, a cistern and, later, a Byzantine church.
 


 
The Galilee is one of the most evocative locales in the New Testament—the area where Jesus was raised and where many of the Apostles came from. Our free eBook The Galilee Jesus Knew focuses on several aspects of Galilee: how Jewish the area was in Jesus’ time, the ports and the fishing industry that were so central to the region, and several sites where Jesus likely stayed and preached.
 

 
The remains combined with the description found in the seventh-century pilgrim account De Locus Sanctis point to the courtyard house found beneath the convent as what may have been regarded as Jesus’ home in Nazareth. Archaeological and geographical evidence from the Church of the Annunciation, the International Marion Center and Mary’s Well come together to suggest that this location may be where Jesus transitioned from boy to man.

Ken Dark also discusses the relationship between the childhood home of Jesus, Nazareth and the important site of Sepphoris. It has been thought that Sepphoris would have provided Joseph with work and Jesus many important cultural experiences. However, Ken Dark believes that Nazareth was a larger town than traditionally understood and was particularly Jewish in its identity—as opposed to the Roman-influenced Sepphoris. This is partially based on the result of his survey of the Nahal Zippori region that separates Sepphoris and Nazareth geographically.

For more on the childhood home of Jesus, read the full article “Has Jesus’ Nazareth House Been Found?” by Ken Dark in the March/April 2015 issue of Biblical Archaeology Review.

——————

BAS Library Members: Read the full article “Has Jesus’ Nazareth House Been Found?” by Ken Dark in the March/April 2015 issue of Biblical Archaeology Review.

Not a BAS Library member yet? Join the BAS Library today.
 


 
This Bible History Daily feature was originally published on March 2, 2015.
 

 
Is it possible to identify the first-century man named Jesus behind the many stories and traditions about him that developed over 2,000 years in the Gospels and church teachings? Visit the Jesus/Historical Jesus study page to read free articles on Jesus in Bible History Daily.
 

 

Related reading in the BAS Library:

Steve Mason, “Where Was Jesus Born?: O Little Town of…Nazareth?” Bible Review, February 2000.

Philip J. King, “Biblical Views: Jesus’ Birthplace and Jesus’ Home,” Biblical Archaeology Review, November/December 2014.

Eric M. Meyers, “The Pools of Sepphoris: Ritual Baths or Bathtubs? Yes, They Are,” Biblical Archaeology Review, July/August 2000.

Mark Chancey and Eric M. Meyers, “Spotlight on Sepphoris: How Jewish Was Sepphoris in Jesus’ Time?” Biblical Archaeology Review, July/August 2000.

Zeev Weiss, “The Sepphoris Synagogue Mosaic,” Biblical Archaeology Review, September/October 2000.

Not a BAS Library member yet? Join the BAS Library today.
 


 
Which finds made our top 10 Biblical archaeology discoveries of 2015? Find out >>
 

 

Posted in Biblical Archaeology Sites, Jesus/Historical Jesus.

Tagged with , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , .

Add Your Comments

59 Responses

Stay in touch with the conversation, subscribe to the RSS feed for comments on this post.

  1. Kurt says

    How did Jesus’ former neighbors respond to his teaching, and what did they fail to recognize about him?
    The audience was stunned. The young man Jesus was standing before them in the synagogue and teaching. He was no stranger to them—he had grown up in their city,Nazareth and for years he had worked among them as a carpenter. Perhaps some of them lived in houses that Jesus had helped to build, or maybe they worked their land with plows and yokes that he had made with his own hands.* But how would they respond to the teaching of this former carpenter?
    Most of those listening were astounded, asking: “Where did this man get this wisdom?” But they also remarked: “This is the carpenter the son of Mary.” (Matthew 13:54-58; Mark 6:1-3) Sadly, Jesus’ onetime neighbors reasoned, ‘This carpenter is just a local man like us.’ Despite the wisdom in his words, they rejected him. Little did they know that the wisdom he shared was not his own.
    Where did Jesus get this wisdom? “What I teach is not mine,” he said, “but belongs to him that sent me.” (John 7:16) The apostle Paul explained that Jesus “has become to us wisdom from God.” (1 Corinthians 1:30) Jehovah’s own wisdom is revealed through his Son, Jesus. Indeed, this was true to such an extent that Jesus could say: “I and the Father are one.” (John 10:30)
    Jesus was now called not only “the carpenter’s son” but also “the carpenter.” Evidently, Jesus had taken over his father’s business and had assumed the role of provider for the family, which included at least six children who were born after him. (Matthew 13:55, 56; Mark 6:3)
    After figuring in an incident that occurred when Jesus was 12 years old, Joseph is absent from the Gospel record. Thereafter, Jesus’ mother and her other children appear but not Joseph. Jesus is once called “the son of Mary” with no reference to Joseph.—Mark 6:3.
    http://wol.jw.org/en/wol/d/r1/lp-e/1200273113

  2. Andrew says

    Perhaps the neighbours were used to Jesus ‘rattling on’ without particularly listening or taking any real notice. veryone’s different and there are plenty of people today who patiently accept and humour neighbours who are a little different to others. It could have been that Jesus’s neighbours were surprised when they suddenly started to take notice of him.

  3. MARK LAJOIE says

    And just down the road from Jesus’ childhood home are the brick house that was the last refuge of the three little pigs and the house of Red Ridinghood’s grandma. The house where Goldilocks met the three bears is thought to be somewhere in the vicinity.

  4. Mark says

    I am very upset that someone using my name has made such a bad comment. I respect and love archaeology and I am a believer with a Masters. This “MARK LAJOIE” would never say such a thing as this.
    Mark Lajoie

  5. CB says

    @Mark (the real one!)

    Perhaps the BAS webmaster could be asked to delete that silly, and unnecessary, comment posted in your name!

    Blessings, and shalom.

  6. ilan says

    All this is supposition. Their is no empirical proof that this was Jesus house or any Biblical persons house. Its more Byzantine relic seeking then anything else.

  7. Thomas says

    I find it difficult to believe that the BAS publishes stuff like this, more suited to the 11:00 Eyewitless News Teams and brainless media eager for startling headlines, whatever the story. You know as well as I do that the odds this is really the site of Jesus’ boyhood home are about as high as the chances I will win the mega-lottery. I assume the full story has the evidence that firmly establishes the provenance, and I will read it, but it’s going to have to be much more substantial than I anticipate to be convincing. I particularly look forward to the chain of events from the time Jesus died as a criminal, unheralded in Nazareth, to someone making sure his boyhood home was preserved as a shrine, to the time many hundreds of years later when institutionally-based Christians took over and built edifices over it.

  8. David says

    So Thomas – are you saying BA should not publish any new find until it is completely vetted (preferably by you) ?

  9. Aurora says

    This would be truly great news, but needs more proof. Still, it is wonderful that a house with original doors, windows and other details survives 2000 years. However, I do not quite understand Kurt’s comment regarding Jesus taking over Joseph’s business and providing “for the family, which included at least six children who were born after him.“ Born after Him?!? Certainly not by Virgin Mary. Matthew 13:55, 56 and Mark 6:3 do not mention children born AFTER Jesus, as there were none. The four boys and two girls were Joseph’s children, not Mary’s. Besides, Joseph was an old man and Mary was a very young girl married to him not in a sense of matrimony as we know it today. She could not reside at the Temple any longer and, as Jesus respected the laws and rules and observed the customs, He could not have been born out of the wedlock, He was circumcised, etc. Joseph and Mary did not consume their marriage, they married for a different purpose.

  10. Paul says

    From the article in the current issue of BAR this house was typical of what a house in Nazareth was like and that the culture there in the 1st century was distinctly Jewish, in contrast to Sepphoris with its Greco-Roman influence. On page 63 is a typical drinking utensil carved from limestone that was not considered susceptible to ritual impurity through exposure to a dead body (Numbers 19:15) and thus would not have to be destroyed; perhaps an indication of what the holy grail looked like (that the action-figure Indiana Jones was after).
    Finds from northern Israel in the 1st and 2nd centuries reveal that the Greek hero Heracles was venerated by the resident Romans, while the Jewish hero counterpart, Sampson, was venerated in the following centuries on Jewish synagogue mosaics.
    http://www.biblicalarchaeology.org/daily/news/hercules-statue-found-in-northern-israel/
    http://www.biblicalarchaeology.org/daily/biblical-artifacts/artifacts-and-the-bible/hercules'-labors-found-in-the-baths/
    In a writing from the 2nd century Gnostic teacher Justin that was preserved by the orthodox Christian theologian Hippolytus in his “Refutation of All Heresies,” a convoluted mythological system involves God or “Elohim” sending the blessing or “Baruch” to the first parents, Adam and Eve, in order to redeem their souls, as well as the prophets, and “finally, Elohim chose a prophet from the uncircumcision, Heracles.” Having labored, however, Heracles succumbs to seduction and “thus the prophecy of Heracles and his works became ineffectual.” Finally, Elohim sends the blessing (Baruch) to Jesus in Nazareth and says to him, “All the prophets before you were seduced; but, Jesus, son of man, try not to be seduced but proclaim this message to men and tell them about the Father and about the Good and ascend to the Good and sit there with Elohim, the Father of us all” (“The Other Bible” by Willis Barnstone, p.640).

  11. Kurt says

    Did Jesus Have Siblings?The Bible`s answer is:
    Yes, Jesus had at least six siblings. These included his brothers James, Joseph, Simon, and Judas as well as at least two sisters. (Matthew 13:54-56; Mark 6:3) Those siblings were natural children of Jesus’ mother, Mary, and her husband, Joseph. (Matthew 1:25) The Bible calls Jesus “the firstborn” of Mary, which implies that she had other children.—Luke 2:7.
    http://www.jw.org/en/bible-teachings/questions/was-jesus-married/

  12. Kurt says

    Misconceptions about Jesus’ brothers:
    In order to support the idea that Mary remained a virgin all her life, some have applied different meanings to the term “brothers.” For example, some feel that Jesus’ brothers were actually sons of Joseph by an earlier marriage. However, the Bible shows that Jesus inherited the legal right to the kingship promised to David. (2 Samuel 7:12, 13; Luke 1:32) If Joseph had been father to sons older than Jesus, the eldest of these would have been Joseph’s legal heir.

    Could the expression refer to Jesus’ disciples, or spiritual brothers? This idea conflicts with the Scriptures, since the Bible says that at one point “his brothers were, in fact, not exercising faith in him.” (John 7:5) The Bible distinguishes Jesus’ brothers from his disciples.—John 2:12.

    According to another theory, Jesus’ brothers were actually his cousins. Yet, the Greek Scriptures use distinct words for “brother,” “relative,” and “cousin.” (Luke 21:16; Colossians 4:10) Many Bible scholars acknowledge that Jesus’ brothers and sisters were his actual siblings. For example, The Expositor’s Bible Commentary states: “The most natural way to understand ‘brothers’ . . . is that the term refers to sons of Mary and Joseph and thus to brothers of Jesus on his mother’s side.” See also The Gospel According to St. Mark, Second Edition, by Vincent Taylor, page 249, and A Marginal Jew—Rethinking the Historical Jesus, by John P. Meier, Volume 1, pages 331-332.
    http://www.jw.org/en/bible-teachings/questions/was-jesus-married/

  13. Paul says

    The fact that this small city preserved its Jewish identity can be seen in the way that Jewish Law prevailed in the prohibition of burying the dead beneath an occupied residence which would render the dwelling ritually impure (Numbers 19:16), though the house adjacent to the “Jesus residence” was converted into a tomb long after falling into disuse and this reminds me of that song written by Robbie Robertson of The Band entitled, “The Weight”:
    “I pulled into Nazareth, was feelin’ about half past dead.
    I just needed some place, where I can lay my head.
    This recalls Jesus’ words; “Foxes have dens and birds have nests but the son of man has no place to lay his head” (Matthew 8:20, Luke 9:58) and this just brings home an idea of what he would miss out on (and who would know better than a carpenter who works on other people’s homes but keeps on carrying that beam to his fate). The term “son of man” (bar enosh) denotes man in his weaker aspect and it was a generic term that applied to any man and used frequently in the book of Ezekiel. Thus the hero Heracles who was part god and part human is a tradition that hails back to the Sumerian Gilgamesh who like Heracles wears a lion’s pelt but after wearing his animal skin while wandering through the desert the garment apparently fused with the body of Gilgamesh and required some effort to remove it and cast it into the sea. Isn’t it ironic how during the reign of the last Chaldean emperor, Daniel saw in a vision a lion coming out of the sea (Daniel 7:4) along with other beasts that represent regional powers of the world that would be ultimately come under the domination of “someone like a son of man” (Daniel 7:13), not unlike the situation described on the sixth day of creation in Genesis and that this process of evolution is still underway and “you are the crown of creation” goes the song from Jefferson Airplane and don’t forget the orangutan’s communication to the other test subject who was a chimpanzee concerning their human captors; “They no like smart ape.”

  14. Aurora says

    “The firstborn” has meaning “the onlyborn”. As simple as that. The way in which the Bible is written requires different kind of reading.

    The book of genesis of Jesus in Matthew, i.e. the account of the genealogy/birth goes from Abraham to David and from David to Joseph. It shows the legal right (through Solomon) to David’s kingship, as He had the same rights as Joseph’s other (older) children. But, in Luke there is genealogy which shows the right (through Nathan) to David’s kingship by blood, and it is actually Mary’s genealogy. In the Greek original, the definite article in genitive stands in front of every name but Joseph’s, thus clearly showing Joseph was included in the account solely because he was married to Mary. Please note that Heli is Joachim, scholars explained how. The bloodline through Nathan also allowed Jesus to avoid the curse “None of his offspring shall succeed in sitting on he throne of David and ruling again in Judah” (Jeremiah 22:30)

  15. Kurt says

    However, some today do not believe that Jesus’ brothers and sisters were children of Joseph and Mary. Why? “The Church,” says the New Catholic Encyclopedia, “from its earliest days taught that Mary was always a virgin. In view of this, then, there can be no doubt that Mary did not have any other children.” The same reference work claims that the words “brother” and “sister” can refer to “some one or ones united in a religious or other common bond” or to relatives, perhaps cousins.
    Is that really the case? Even some Catholic theologians, disagreeing with the traditional doctrine, support the view that Jesus had fleshly brothers and sisters. John P. Meier, former president of the Catholic Bible Association of America, wrote: “In the N[ew] T[estament] adelphos [brother], when used not merely figuratively or metaphorically but rather to designate some sort of physical or legal relationship, means only full or half-brother, and nothing else.”
    “The Brothers and Sisters of Jesus in Ecumenical Perspective,” by J. P. Meier, The Catholic Biblical Quarterly, January 1992, page 21.

    GENEALOGY OF JESUS CHRIST
    http://wol.jw.org/en/wol/d/r1/lp-e/1200273113

  16. Gary says

    Sepphoris was where the Synagogue was…As well as the temples of many other gods. It was Mary’s home, and they walked there on Shabbat. It is only 3.5 miles downhill, nothing. Joseph likely worked there, or made materials for both there and the farming region of Nazareth. Nazareth was 100 to 200 souls, or about 20 to 30 houses. The 10,000 souls? The Hellenistic city of Sepphoris. Sepphoris is the descended dove (Zipporah) upon the mount; it is the white shining limestone city on the hill over the Plain of Megiddo.

    Nazareth? After the destruction of the Second Temple, the descendants of Solomon within the priesthood, resettled there. Where their relatives were already hiding…

    For James to serve in the Temple as an alternate, Joseph had to be among the Kohanim.

    The cliff, by the synagogue ? It is the façade of the main streets Sepphoris. The cliff is carved into the cross streets of some Roman towns, where they leveled the streets by excavation, and carved shops into the rock face on either side.

  17. James says

    There sure are a lot of Negative Nancys on here. The odds of this being Jesus’s house is exactly equal to the total number of houses in Nasareth. Only physical evidence can increase those odds but either way, it is still awesome to find remains of a home from when he actually lived there. You people should try the glass half full approach from time to time.

  18. Dave says

    Don’t you believe this is a bit presumptious stating that one of the many houses built in Nazareth for the residents of Nazareth which has Deen found 2,000 years later is in fact the childhood home of Jesus Christ. It could have been any resident of Nazareth who lived and grew up there. What makes it Jesus’s home ?? The church built over a home in Nazareth was built many years after Jesus’s death.

  19. Stuart says

    I keep on seeing the words “could have been…” , “may have been…”, “probably…” In the articles written concerning this dug up house.
    Some people have jumped the gun and are assuming that they said “definitely was Jesus’ house.
    Then there are some mathematical statements about outlandish “odds” which are astronomical to say the least. If as one commentator stated, that there were probably only 20 to 30 odd houses in the village at the time of Christ then that would make the odds about 20 or 30 to 1, which are a lot better odds at it being more probable than the astronomical odds of wining the mega lottery, whichever lottery they are talking about.
    Another thing to consider is that just because the “convent” was built a few hundred years later over a building, does not exclude traditional belief that this was in fact Jesus’ boyhood house. Tradition can be both truthful as well as fallacious. So one must not assume that time will necessarily make tradition to be wrong.

  20. Paul says

    Could have been Jesus’s house. Could be an 8000 BC temple. Depends on your perspective.

  21. Chaya says

    This is incredibly backward technologically in that it is not possible to reply to a specific post. For the person who said this piece would go better on some sensationalist news site, it would go well on World Nut Daily. I am becoming discouraged as supposed academic and scientific sites are going all soft, fuzzy and infotainment.

  22. Barbara says

    I love reading all the bits and pieces that are discussed on this forum, but Jesus came for a special purpose, so don’t let us get sidetracked.

    ‘Look at my Servant, see my Chosen One. He is my Beloved, in whom my Soul delights. I will put my Spirit upon Him, and He Will Judge The Nations.’

  23. Adeline says

    Adele- Is there any possible way to know if Jesus sibling’s were of Mary as my Husband adamantly agrees.But on my Grandmother’s teaching to me from her Bible 1700 she read from.Her explanation to me was Joseph was in his 40’s Mary but 12-13,That Joseph had children already.Please clear this tormenting thought to me which is correct?

  24. KathleenM says

    Yeshua may have had half brothers (4) and sisters (2) from Yo-sef’s first marriage, according to the stories that he was a widowed man, and won Miriam’s hand as a protector/celibate mate as we might say, when she was of age to leave the Temple. Some stories say the stick he chose when all the unmarried Hebrew men were called to Temple, either blossomed, or a dove flew down and landed on his shoulder showing the priests that he was favored to care for her, and thus for Yeshua or Jesus in his childhood. There is a wood working shop near or attached to this house which must be why it is considered their home in Nazareth, however that is of course a guess. Homes were made of stone/mud brick, but perhaps Yo sef did some of the work making stools, beams in roofs, or window lattices. Roofs were straw over wooden beams imported from somewhere the trees were – maybe dragged by donkeys like the Ethiopians do today? But Nazareth was a small town of only 300 people, a few extended families, so much of the work would have been done in other towns where Romans lived too possibly. This small town would have been a safe place to live, farming was the mode of livelihood for most residents, around the city. Some stories say Yo sef was 111 when he died peacefully with his wife and family around him. He must have been a wonderful caretaker, to take Miriam in at an early age, even 7 or 8 possibly, before or as she was maturing – the oldest stories say she was 16 when Yeshua was born in a cave or a dwelling of some kind near Bethlehem. Augustus did call for “registration” of people possibly for a Roman world wide celebration during his lifetime, altho there is no recorded census for taxes that has been found. There was no room in the common place possibly in a synagog near Bethlehem, although there were no motels in those days, so a manger was offered by someone for the child to be placed in, a normal practice, like we used to use drawers in dressers put on a bed for babies when I was young, nothing fancy. A manger was a kind of basket sometimes used for feeding animals or carrying items like we do today. It is fun to imagine Miriam weaving or making thread on the roof of the home, keeping cool, going to get water in the early a.m. at the well, or even hiding her family below ground in the cellars if the Romans came by the town. No Romans lived here by any report, just Hebrews around 0 CE, a good safe place – water, fields and probably some wild birds and small animal, or goats to supplement the diet. The testing of bones shows the people ate low protein diets. I think Yo sef was not extremely poor but hid his family here (even his wealth) and probably helped the townspeople survive in his day. A synagog could be built or the meetings held in homes anywhere there were 12 men, women were respected highly and children, all could attend the torah readings I believe, and women maybe met together and spoke of God. No synagog has been found yet in Nazarath, but Magdala did have one that held 200 people (see internet). Perhaps people met in Yo sef’s house on the Sabbath, as they did in Peter’s home too (Simon and Andrew) North of the Sea of Galilee. These were wise men and women and part of a revival of purity in Galilee and Judea, taking holy names used in the Old Testament and wanting to raise their children well – teaching the Psalms and the Proverbs to the young by memory. When 12 Yesh ua went to the Temple for his bar mitzvah, and probably walked with many of his cousins and family members to Jerusalem, probably 4 or 5 days walk or more, don’t you think?

Continuing the Discussion

  1. This House in Nazareth Offers Hints About Jesus' Childhood Town | Trend Inside linked to this post on March 2, 2015

    […] Read the full scientific paper via the Biblical Archaeology Review. […]

  2. This House in Nazareth Offers Hints About Jesus’ Childhood Town | Electro linked to this post on March 3, 2015

    […] Read the full scientific paper via the Biblical Archaeology Review. […]

  3. Британские археологи наши в Израиле предположительный дом Христа ՕՐԵՐ.am linked to this post on March 3, 2015

    […] израильском Назарете, где, вероятно, вырос Спаситель, пишет журнал Biblical Archeology […]

  4. This House In Nazareth Offers Hints About Jesus' Childhood Town | Gizmodo Australia linked to this post on March 3, 2015

    […] Read the full scientific paper via the Biblical Archaeology Review. […]

  5. Британские археологи наши в Израиле предположительный дом ХристаРусскоязычная Британия | Русскоязычная Британия linked to this post on March 3, 2015

    […] Назарете, где, вероятно, вырос Иисус Христос, пишет журнал Biblical Archeology […]

  6. La vraie maison où Jésus a grandi a peut-être été découverte | Planete Elea Radio linked to this post on March 3, 2015

    […] Ken Dark de l’université de Reading révèle que la maison où Jésus a passé son enfance pourrait avoir été découverte. Le site, mis au jour pour la première fois en 1880, est situé sous le couvent des Sœurs de […]

  7. Desentierran una cueva en la que se cree que pudo vivir Jesucristo | Tol.News linked to this post on March 3, 2015

    […] lo afirma, al menos, el susodicho investigador en un artículo publicado por la revista «Biblical Archaeology Review». La vivienda está fechada en el siglo I y, según afirman, podría ser el lugar en el que María […]

  8. Desentierran una cueva en la que se cree que pudo vivir Jesucristo - Actualidad | Actualidad linked to this post on March 3, 2015

    […] lo afirma, al menos, el susodicho investigador en un artículo publicado por la revista «Biblical Archaeology Review». La vivienda está fechada en el siglo I y, según afirman, podría ser el lugar en el queMaría […]

  9. El Profe Morales – Desentierran una cueva en la que se cree que pudo vivir Jesucristo linked to this post on March 3, 2015

    […] lo afirma, al menos, el susodicho investigador en un artículo publicado por la revista «Biblical Archaeology Review». La vivienda está fechada en el siglo I y, según afirman, podría ser el lugar en el que María […]

  10. Descubren la casa en la que Jesucristo pasó su infancia ⋆ Noticias de hoy linked to this post on March 3, 2015

    […] descubrimiento, publicado en la Revista de la Arqueología Sociedad Bíblica ( BAR ) describe restos de la casa y explora las pruebas que determinan que ese era su […]

  11. ¡Desentierran una cueva en la que se cree que pudo vivir Jesucristo! | Venemartin linked to this post on March 3, 2015

    […] lo afirma, al menos, el susodicho investigador en un artículo publicado por la revista «Biblical Archaeology Review». La vivienda está fechada en el siglo I y, según afirman, podría ser el lugar en el queMaría […]

  12. Desentierran una cueva en la que se cree que pudo vivir Jesucristo | CANAL DE MISTERIO linked to this post on March 3, 2015

    […] lo afirma, al menos, el susodicho investigador en un artículo publicado por la revista «Biblical Archaeology Review». La vivienda está fechada en el siglo I y, según afirman, podría ser el lugar en el que María […]

  13. Arqueólogos afirman haber descubierto la casa donde vivió Jesús | Radio Paulina 89.3 linked to this post on March 3, 2015

    […] Biblical Archaeology, […]

  14. Jesus’ Childhood Home May Have Been Found, Archaeologist Says linked to this post on March 3, 2015

    […] University archaeologist Dr. Ken Dark, who dated the Jewish house to the early first century A.D., wrote in an article published in the […]

  15. » Descubren la casa en la que Jesucristo pasó su infancia linked to this post on March 3, 2015

    […] descubrimiento, publicado en la revista de la Biblical Arqueology Society (BAR) describe restos de la casa y explora en las evidencias que determinan que ese fue su […]

  16. La vraie maison où Jésus a grandi a peut-être été découverte | NetAfrique.net linked to this post on March 3, 2015

    […] Ken Dark de l’université de Reading révèle que la maison où Jésus a passé son enfance pourrait avoir été découverte. Le site, mis au jour pour la première fois en 1880, est situé sous le couvent des Sœurs de […]

  17. Descubren la casa en la que Jesucristo pasó su infancia linked to this post on March 3, 2015

    […] Liderado por Ken Dark, este decubrimiento , publicado en la revista de la ‘Biblical Arqueology Society’ (BAR), no sólo report los restos de la propia casa, sino que explora entre las evidencias que determinan […]

  18. Desentierran una cueva (casa) en la que se cree que pudo vivir Jesucristo | Reporte Católico Laico linked to this post on March 4, 2015

    […] lo afirma, al menos, el susodicho investigador en un artículo publicado por la revista «Biblical Archaeology Review». La vivienda está fechada en el siglo I y, según afirman, podría ser el lugar en el queMaría […]

  19. Desentierran una cueva en la que se cree que pudo vivir Jesucristo | Colegio San Vicente de Paúl Ikastetxea linked to this post on March 4, 2015

    […] lo afirma, al menos, el susodicho investigador en un artículo publicado por la revista «Biblical Archaeology Review». La vivienda está fechada en el siglo I y, según afirman, podría ser el lugar en el que María […]

  20. ¿Pasó Jesucristo su infancia en esta casa? ⋆ Noticias de hoy linked to this post on March 4, 2015

    […] hasta que el proyecto se inició en 2006. El descubrimiento, publicado en la revista de “ Arqueología Sociedad Bíblica “(BAR) describe restos de la casa y explorar en la evidencia que se determinó en su lugar. […]

  21. Arqueólogos afirman haber descubierto la casa donde vivió Jesús « La Universal radio linked to this post on March 4, 2015

    […] Fuente: Biblical Archaeology,  LiveScience, http://www.latercera.com/ […]

  22. Arqueólogos descubren la casa de Jesús de Nazareth | Videosparaflipar.com linked to this post on March 4, 2015

    […] la casa estaba habitada por una familia judía, lo que apoyaría la idea de que podría haber sido la casa de Jesús . Pero la evidencia más fuerte viene de la decoración de las paredes, y no había […]

  23. Desentierran una cueva en la que se cree pudo vivir Jesucristo - Turismo religioso, viajes y peregrinaciones a tierra santa linked to this post on March 5, 2015

    […] lo afirma, al menos, el susodicho investigador en un artículo publicado por la revista «Biblical Archaeology Review». La vivienda está fechada en el siglo I y, según afirman, podría ser el lugar en el que María […]

  24. Archaeologist Says House In Nazareth Could Have Been Jesus' Childhood Home « CauseHub linked to this post on March 5, 2015

    […] and his group began excavating beneath the Sisters of Nazareth convent in 2006, according to Biblical Archaeology. He then discovered what is said to be a first-century […]

  25. Desentierran una cueva en la que se cree que pudo vivir Jesucristo » Congregación de la Misión, Provincia Canónica de Zaragoza linked to this post on March 6, 2015

    […] lo afirma, al menos, el susodicho investigador en un artículo publicado por la revista «Biblical Archaeology Review». La vivienda está fechada en el siglo I y, según afirman, podría ser el lugar en el que María […]

  26. Jesus Christ’s Possible Childhood Home Found Beneath Convent in Nazareth | bhzoom.net linked to this post on March 6, 2015

    […] the Biblical Archaeology Review magazine, Dark has presented some strong archaeological and geographical evidence to prove that […]

  27. Christian Cruises & ToursChildhood Home Of Jesus Possibly Found! - Christian Cruises & Tours linked to this post on March 6, 2015

    […] where Jesus was raised. Ellen White, author of Biblical Archeology Society’s article “Has the Childhood Home of Jesus Been Found,” writes, “Ken Dark also discusses the relationship between the childhood home of […]

  28. Desentierran una cueva en la que se cree que pudo vivir Jesucristo » Recursos Académicos linked to this post on March 7, 2015

    […] lo afirma, al menos, el susodicho investigador en un artículo publicado por la revista «Biblical Archaeology Review». La vivienda está fechada en el siglo I y, según afirman, podría ser el lugar en el que María […]

  29. Descubren la que fue, posiblemente, la casa de Jesucristo linked to this post on March 7, 2015

    […] Vía | Biblical Archaelogy Society […]

  30. Archaeology and the boyhood of Jesus in Nazareth linked to this post on March 12, 2015

    […] Studies at England’s University of Reading, reports in the current issue of the “Biblical Archaeology Review,” some very interesting discoveries have been made there in recent […]

  31. Arqueólogos descubren la casa de Jesús de Nazareth | losmasnew linked to this post on March 19, 2015

    […] la casa era habitada por una familia judía, lo cual soportaría la idea de que podría haber sido la casa de Jesús. Pero la evidencia más fuerte surge de la decoración de las paredes, y no de los […]

  32. Arqueólogos descubren la casa de Jesús de Nazareth | Panamá Punto Com linked to this post on March 21, 2015

    […] la casa era habitada por una familia judía, lo cual soportaría la idea de que podría haber sido la casa de Jesús. Pero la evidencia más fuerte surge de la decoración de las paredes, y no de los […]

  33. Lesley’s Lagniappe ~ 3-24-15 | Michelle Lesley linked to this post on March 24, 2015

    […] Has the Childhood Home of Jesus Been Found?- The childhood home of Jesus may have been found underneath the Sisters of Nazareth Convent in Nazareth, Israel, according to archaeologist Ken Dark. […]

  34. Foto – Encuentran posible casa donde Jesús se crió | LaSandia.net linked to this post on April 26, 2015

    […] a fondo hasta 2006. Liderado por Ken Dark, este decubrimiento , publicado en la revista de la‘Biblical Arqueology Society’ (BAR), no sólo describe los restos de la propia casa, sino que explora entre las evidencias que […]


Some HTML is OK

or, reply to this post via trackback.


Enter Your Log In Credentials

Change Password

×