Breaking News—Evidence of Cultic Activity in Judah Discovered at Khirbet Qeiyafa

Breaking News—Evidence of Cultic Activity in Judah Discovered at Khirbet Qeiyafa

Hebrew University of Jerusalem's Yosef Garfinkel with a stone shrine model found at Khirbet Qeiyafa (Credit: Hebrew University of Jerusalem).

 

The exciting finds just keep coming at Khirbet Qeiyafa. This unique, fortified Judahite city on the border with Philistia had a short-lived existence between 1020 and 980 B.C.E., according to carbon-dated remains excavated at the site, that places it at the dawn of the Israelite Monarchy, the time of King Saul and King David. In 2008, excavation director Yosef Garfinkel of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem revealed an ostracon with five lines of early script that had been discovered at Khirbet Qeiyafa. Among the earliest examples of alphabetic writing found in Israel, the enigmatic Qeiyafa Ostracon has been the focus of several articles in Biblical Archaeology Review, including two features in the May/June 2012 issue.

 


Want to learn more about cult at Khirbet Qeiyafa directly from excavation director Yosef Garfinkel? Check out the brand new DVD “The Sanctuary of Khirbet Qeiyafa.” Garfinkel’s recent dynamic lecture includes illuminating slides highlighting evidence of the city’s unique early Judahite cult.


 

Now even more fascinating finds from Khirbet Qeiyafa are shedding light on the crucial historical period of King David. Announced today at a press conference in Jerusalem, Garfinkel shared with the public for the first time several cultic items that were recently excavated from three “shrine rooms” at the site, including two portable shrine models, two basalt altars, two pottery libation vessels and five standing stones. According to Garfinkel and his codirector, Saar Ganor of the Israel Antiquities Authority, these finds offer the first clear archaeological evidence of cultic activity in Judah during the time of King David. The shrine models also show the existence of sophisticated royal architecture styles during that period and may shed light on design elements of Solomon’s Temple as described in the Bible.

See the images and press release below from the Hebrew University for more about the discovery that has the archaeological world buzzing.

 


 

 

View a slideshow of the newly announced finds from Khirbet Qeiyafa below.

 

 

Hover cursor over image to read caption.

 


 

 

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem Department of Media Relations

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Hebrew University archaeologist finds the first evidence of a cult in Judah at the time of King David, with implications for Solomon’s Temple

Jerusalem, May 8, 2012—Prof. Yosef Garfinkel, the Yigal Yadin Professor of Archaeology at the Institute of Archaeology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, announced today the discovery of objects that for the first time shed light on how a cult was organized in Judah at the time of King David. During recent archaeological excavations at Khirbet Qeiyafa, a fortified city in Judah adjacent to the Valley of Elah, Garfinkel and colleagues uncovered rich assemblages of pottery, stone and metal tools, and many art and cult objects. These include three large rooms that served as cultic shrines, which in their architecture and finds correspond to the biblical description of a cult at the time of King David.

This discovery is extraordinary as it is the first time that shrines from the time of early biblical kings were uncovered. Because these shrines pre-date the construction of Solomon’s temple in Jerusalem by 30 to 40 years, they provide the first physical evidence of a cult in the time of King David, with significant implications for the fields of archaeology, history, biblical and religion studies.

Located approximately 30 km. southwest of Jerusalem in the valley of Elah, Khirbet Qeiyafa was a border city of the Kingdom of Judah opposite the Philistine city of Gath. The city, which was dated by 10 radiometric measurements (14C) done at Oxford University on burned olive pits, existed for a short period of time between ca. 1020 to 980 BCE, and was violently destroyed.

The biblical tradition presents the people of Israel as conducting a cult different from all other nations of the ancient Near East by being monotheistic and an-iconic (banning human or animal figures). However, it is not clear when these practices were formulated, if indeed during the time of the monarchy (10-6th centuries BC), or only later, in the Persian or Hellenistic eras.

The absence of cultic images of humans or animals in the three shrines provides evidence that the inhabitants of the place practiced a different cult than that of the Canaanites or the Philistines, observing a ban on graven images.

The findings at Khirbet Qeiyafa also indicate that an elaborate architectural style had developed as early as the time of King David. Such construction is typical of royal activities, thus indicating that state formation, the establishment of an elite, social level and urbanism in the region existed in the days of the early kings of Israel. These finds strengthen the historicity of the biblical tradition and its architectural description of the Palace and Temple of Solomon.

According to Prof. Garfinkel, “This is the first time that archaeologists uncovered a fortified city in Judah from the time of King David. Even in Jerusalem we do not have a clear fortified city from his period. Thus, various suggestions that completely deny the biblical tradition regarding King David and argue that he was a mythological figure, or just a leader of a small tribe, are now shown to be wrong.” Garfinkel continued, “Over the years, thousands of animal bones were found, including sheep, goats and cattle, but no pigs. Now we uncovered three cultic rooms, with various cultic paraphernalia, but not even one human or animal figurine was found. This suggests that the population of Khirbet Qeiyafa observed two biblical bans—on pork and on graven images—and thus practiced a different cult than that of the Canaanites or the Philistines.”

Description of the findings and their significance

The three shrines are part of larger building complexes. In this respect they are different from Canaanite or Philistine cults, which were practiced in temples—separate buildings dedicated only to rituals. The biblical tradition described this phenomenon in the time of King David: “He brought the ark of God from a private house in Kyriat Yearim and put it in Jerusalem in a private house” (2 Samuel 6).

The cult objects include five standing stones (Massebot), two basalt altars, two pottery libation vessels and two portable shrines. No human or animal figurines were found, suggesting the people of Khirbet Qeiyafa observed the biblical ban on graven images.

Two portable shrines (or “shrine models”) were found, one made of pottery (ca. 20 cm high) and the other of stone (35 cm high). These are boxes in the shape of temples, and could be closed by doors.

The clay shrine is decorated with an elaborate façade, including two guardian lions, two pillars, a main door, beams of the roof, folded textile and three birds standing on the roof. Two of these elements are described in Solomon’s Temple: the two pillars (Yachin and Boaz) and the textile (Parochet).

The stone shrine is made of soft limestone and painted red. Its façade is decorated by two elements. The first are seven groups of roof-beams, three planks in each. This architectural element, the “triglyph,” is known in Greek classical temples, like the Parthenon in Athens. Its appearance at Khirbet Qeiyafa is the earliest known example carved in stone, a landmark in world architecture.

The second decorative element is the recessed door. This type of doors or windows is known in the architecture of temples, palaces and royal graves in the ancient Near East. This was a typical symbol of divinity and royalty at the time.

The stone model helps us to understand obscure technical terms in the description of Solomon’s palace as described in 1 Kings 7, 1-6. The text uses the term “Slaot,” which were mistakenly understood as pillars and can now be understood as triglyphs. The text also uses the term “Sequfim”, which was usually understood as nine windows in the palace, and can now be understood as “triple recessed doorway.”

Similar triglyphs and recessed doors can be found in the description of Solomon’s temple (1 Kings 6, Verses 5, 31-33, and in the description of a temple by the prophet Ezekiel (41:6). These biblical texts are replete with obscure technical terms that have lost their original meaning over the millennia. Now, with the help of the stone model uncovered at Khirbet Qeiyafa, the biblical text is clarified. For the first time in history we have actual objects from the time of David, which can be related to monuments described in the Bible.
 


 

Read some of the highlights on Khirbet Qeiyafa and house shrines in the BAS Library.

Gerard Leval “Ancient Inscription Refers to the Birth of Israelite MonarchyBiblical Archaeology Review May/June 2012.

Christopher Rollston “What’s the Oldest Hebrew Inscription?” Biblical Archaeology Review May/June 2012

Shanks, Hershel. “Newly Discovered: A Fortified City from King David’s Time.Biblical Archaeology Review, Jan/Feb 2009, 38-43.

Garfinkel, Yosef. “The Birth & Death of Biblical Minimalism.” Biblical Archaeology Review, May/Jun 2011, 46–53, 78.

Dever, William G. “A Temple Built for Two.Biblical Archaeology Review, Mar/Apr 2008, 55-62, 85.

Davies, Philip. “A Minimalist Disputes His Demise.” Biblical Archaeology Review Web Exclusive, December 2011.

Shanks, Hershel. “The Untouchables: Scholars Fear to Publish Ancient House Shrine.Biblical Archaeology Review, Nov/Dec 2005, 20-25.

Posted in Artifacts and the Bible, Biblical Archaeology Sites.

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  1. Michael says

    I love this article. I have been following this and i am so glad that more information has come out. I would like to know how you would differentiate between a household that stayed true to God during this period and one that did not. The Temple was not yet built in Jerusalem so the Mosaic Tabernacle, I believe, was still set up at Shiloh and many, but not all worshiped there. Some sacrificed on “High Places” 1 Kings 3:2. So was it ok to have a cult shrine, again I assume, that was used to worship Jehovah?
    Blessings!

  2. Erik says

    “the population of Khirbet Qeiyafa observed two biblical bans—on pork and on graven images—and thus practiced a different cult than that of the Canaanites or the Philistines”

    Ipso facto, the “Biblicality” of the site, seemingly implies the “Biblicality” of its famous Ostracon inscription (which would favor Prof. Gershon Galil’s rendering).

  3. Erik says

    “The city … existed for a short period of time between ca. 1020 to 980 BCE, and was violently destroyed”

    Cp. the NOVA / NGC documentary “Quest for King Solomon’s Mines”, which emphasizes Pharaoh Sheshonq’s campaign across Canaan five years after King Solomon’s reign. If Egypt, and Egypt’s Philistine allies, were campaigning against Israel; then perhaps the Pharaoh actually did marry his daughter to Solomon, as a spy?

Continuing the Discussion

  1. Encuentran objetos de la época de David « De mi Pluma linked to this post on May 13, 2012

    [...] información de Bible History Daily Compartelo en las RedesCompartirMe gusta:Me gustaSé el primero en decir que te gusta esta [...]

  2. The Fortress on the Elah | theoutwardquest linked to this post on May 29, 2012

    [...] Bible History Daily quotes him: “According to Prof. Garfinkel, ‘This is the first time that archaeologists uncovered a fortified city in Judah from the time of King David. Even in Jerusalem we do not have a clear fortified city from his period. Thus, various suggestions that completely deny the biblical tradition regarding King David and argue that he was a mythological figure, or just a leader of a small tribe, are now shown to be wrong’.” [...]


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